LMC Course Descriptions

 

LMC 2050 N – Literature, Media, and Communication Seminar

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Catalog Info: This course introduces second-semester majors to the intellectual movements, interpretive frameworks, and research skills central to the disciplines represented in LMC. Course Prerequisites: English 1102 and LMC 2000.
Description: This course introduces second-semester majors to the six threads on which LMC majors can focus and to both primary and secondary research. The class will begin with an intensive study of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (literature, social justice, and science, technology, and culture) and to the various media in which it has been adapted. Students will then move into the more active study of social justice as it impacts Atlanta and the campus and will be encouraged to present their findings in ways that encourage exploration of communication practices and design.

LMC 2720 H – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Catalog Info: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Description: Instructor: Dr. M. Asad

Principles of Visual Design is a studio course where students will develop skills to produce visual artifacts and critique their designs This is a survey course, meaning that students will briefly work with various visual forms and media, including both digital and non-digital. This course will offer lectures, readings, and in-class activities to both create visual artifacts and analyze their formal qualities in order to better understand the influence of visual design in contemporary culture.

LMC 2720 J – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: MWF 10:10 am - 11:00 am
Catalog Info: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Description: Instructor: J. Fisher

Principles of Visual Design is a studio course in which students develop skills to visually represent and critique their ideas in various visual forms and media. The course will offer lectures, readings and in-class activities and discussions to cover the following areas to show how we think and communicate through visual means.

• Principles and elements of art and design: How to analyze visual design in formal ways
• Media, techniques of art and design: How materials and techniques define what we do and communicate through art and design
• Visual language in the 21st century: History of art and design, how they have influenced approaches to design

Students will learn how to be critical of their own work, the work of others, and learn how to analyze designs from various historical and theoretical perspectives.

LMC 3104 N – The Age of Scientific Discovery

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 268
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Catalog Info: Examines the relationships among texts representing the literary, artistic, and scientific thought of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Description: We will make inroads into understanding the dynamics of the cultural explosion in art, literature, technology and science that constitutes the early modern period in the West.

LMC 3112 D – Evolution and the Industrial Age

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Location: Skiles 169
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: Connects later nineteenth century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This class focuses on the rise of industrialism and colonialism in the nineteenth century and connects later nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the fiction and poetry of the long nineteenth century. Students will read from the works of Charles Darwin and his contemporaries and analyze the representation of science and technology in short stories, novels, poetry, and scientific prose. Discussion will focus especially on how science and social values overlap, particularly in narrative representations of ethnicity, gender, and class.

LMC 3114 G – Science, Technology, and Modernism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: MWF 12:20 pm - 1:10 pm
Catalog Info: Explores a cross-section of technological, scientific, and cultural production characteristics of the first half of the twentieth century.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: We examine a cross-section of the cultural/political/scientific ferment in the West in the first part of the 20th century—a time of general cultural paradigm crisis provoking new forms and models, new languages and dialects, as it were, for representing and making sense of the experience of modernity. The course materials are a mix of theoretical essays, scientific writings, and elite and popular artistic works. The material can be challenging (both in quality and quantity) but I think you will often find it exciting. Learning Outcomes: Students will have an informed sense of the intricately complex ways in which modern technology, modern science, modern political economy, urban concentrations of population, and modern warfare (WWI) affect and influence psychological and cultural contexts.

LMC 3202 HP – Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MW 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Catalog Info: Examines the elements of fiction and what has made fiction, especially the novel, distinctive, popular, and enduring. Readings may include formal, cultural, and historical theories.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Instructor: S. Dobranski

"Short Fiction and Personal Narrative"

Novelist and environmental activist Barbara Kingsolver once wrote, "A good short story cannot simply be Lit Lite, but the successful execution of large truths delivered in tight spaces." By closely studying literary terms (e.g. symbol, allegory, point of view) in this class, you will discover how authors communicate so much information, emotion, and tension in so little time. An appreciation for these techniques should enhance your enjoyment of all fiction and encourage you to adopt the "less is more" strategy in your own carefully crafted essays. You will learn close-reading skills that will enrich your understanding of any text, and you will come away from the course with an overview of American literary history since the nineteenth century.

The Honors Program version of this class will include an examination of non-fiction personal narrative as a discipline that draws from elements of the short story with important differences. HP students will complete exercises related to reflection and personal discovery (of strengths, experiences, values, and long-term goals). The final written assignment will be a personal narrative that might be adapted in future terms for use in applications to graduate or professional school or to prestigious fellowship opportunities, such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Truman, or Goldwater Scholarships.

LMC 3202 S – Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: MW 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Catalog Info: Examines the elements of fiction and what has made fiction, especially the novel, distinctive, popular, and enduring. Readings may include formal, cultural, and historical theories.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: "Global Science Fiction"

The course explores science fiction (SF) as a global language that enables people to communicate their ideas about science and technology across centuries, continents, and cultures. In the first part of this class, we will explore how SF developed as a unique genre with its own artists, audiences, publishing venues, and stylistic rules between the late 1800s and the early 1960s. While much of this early activity took place in Europe and the United States, we will also explore how artists from other areas of the world—especially Bengal, the USSR, Latin America, and Japan—contributed to the genre as well. In the second part of this class, we will examine how SF has spread across the globe from the 1960s to the present, with special emphasis on stories from Africa, India, China, Northern Europe, and the indigenous U.S. that show how authors continue to elaborate on and transform the genre by using classic SF techniques to speak both local and global experiences with science, technology, and culture.

LMC 3208 N – African-American Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Susana Morris
Location: Skiles 271
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Catalog Info: Explores the works of African-American writers from the Colonial period to the present and examines a variety of cultural constructs that have fundamentally shaped the African-American literary tradition.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: "Contemporary Black Women Writers"

This course focuses on the canon of contemporary Black literature by exploring how Black women write about what it means to be Black and a woman in the twenty-first century. We will examine contemporary Black literary and cultural movements through an exploration of fiction, film, poetry, and nonfiction, while paying close attention to the various historical and social contexts the works influence and emerge from.

LMC 3214 D – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Susana Morris
Location: Skiles 257
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: "Afrofuturism"

Afrofuturism, a term that refers to the ways in which Black cultural producers participate in shaping the future through the melding of art and technology, is a vibrant and rapidly expanding field of cultural production and critique. We will pay particular attention to the transgressive stylings of Black science fiction and fantasy cultural productions and how Afrofuturism reflects the complicated politics of envisioning the future. Expect readings from authors such as Octavia Butler, Samuel Delaney, N.K. Jemisin, Nnedi Okorafor, and Kai Ashante Wilson, among others, and films, such as Black Panther and Get Out.

LMC 3215 F – Science Fiction Film TV

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 9:30 am - 10:45 am; Screenings: T 3:00-5:00 pm
Catalog Info: This course investigates science fiction as the genre developed during film history and has become one of the most popular forms of television narrative.
Description: This course explores how a specific genre works and what happens when it crosses conventional media boundaries. Specifically, it focuses on science fiction as it has developed during film history and as it has evolved into a popular form of television narrative. The course initially examines how we define and distinguish different genres, how they share elements, and how they function culturally. It then considers how these generic characteristics developed from silent film to the present, and it looks at several popular television series to determine what these media versions of the genre share and how they differ. The course objectives are: to better understand how a particular genre works, to gain a sense of media science fiction’s history and themes, and to see how it is inflected by the medium in which it appears. Students attend weekly screenings, read materials on genre and science fiction, and discuss these texts. Grades depend on two tests, a final, an oral/written report, and a research paper.

LMC 3225 Q – Gender Study in the Disciplines

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: MW 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Catalog Info: This course explores the concept of gender and its usefulness as a theoretical category in a variety of disciplines. it includes cultural studies of literature, communication media, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, and science.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This course will introduce you to gender studies, a field of inquiry that draws on the analytic techniques of different disciplines (including literature, cultural studies, history, psychology, economics, etc.) to help us better understand how specific groups of people think about sex and gender relations at specific moments in history.

This semester we will focus specifically on the “cultural history of gender in politics and speculative fiction.” In particular, we will examine key political documents in the history of feminism, the men’s movement, and LGBTQIA rights advocacy in relation to gothic and utopian literature as well as science fiction. By examining clusters of future-oriented, politically progressive texts in relation to their specific historical and cultural moments, we will be able to begin answering the following questions: What is sex? What is gender? What debates over sex and gender emerge at specific cultural moments, and why? What aesthetic forms are associated with these political debates, and how do they impact our thinking about sex and gender?

LMC 3226 L – Major Authors

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 1:55 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: An examination of the works and career of a major author in historical and cultural context.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This section of 3226 will focus on the work of James Joyce, one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. We will begin with some of Joyce’s short stories (Dubliners), then quickly read his first novel (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). This will prepare us to tackle Ulysses, a famously difficult novel, but as fascinating as it is difficult. Readers tend to find its strange combination of complexity and simplicity fascinating or annoying. For those who engage with it on its own terms, this novel is an experience of extraordinary linguistic and intellectual and emotional energy. If you are willing and able to put in the substantial time and effort required by this course then I think you will find Ulysses among the most remarkable novels you will ever read.

LMC 3252 N – Studies in Film and Television

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 002
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm; Screenings: T 3:00-5:00 pm
Catalog Info: Prerequisite: LCC 2400 or LCC 2500

Explores in depth a theoretical issue central to film and/or television. Among its concerns are authorship, genre theory, spectatorship, ideology, narrative theory, and the relationship between these media and social history.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Screenings location: Skiles 371

This course will focus entirely on films that radically adapt or even challenge the assumptions of key Shakespearean texts and take on a life of their own as classic films. The films will include Kurasawa’s well known samurai adaptations, Bollywood variations, Science Fiction adaptations of The Tempest, such as Forbidden Planet, and more. There is no textbook other than the films, but you will be referred to selected online sites and the term essay will be a research paper.

LMC 3255 D – Cinema & Digital Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Gregory Zinman
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm; Screenings: 3:00-5:00 pm
Catalog Info: This course will introduce students to the key themes, motifs, and forms of digital cinema in order to understand how technological change shapes the moving image in the present day. Prerequisites: English 1102.
Description: Screenings in Skiles 002.

This course will introduce students to the key themes, motifs, and forms of digital cinema in order to understand how technological change shapes the moving image in the present day. By examining a variety of works from commercial, independent, art-world, and online cinema, the class will explore the relationships between cinema and digital culture. These include the putative “death of cinema”; the changing nature of cinematic spectacle; the relationship of cinema to other media forms; the influence of video games on the current cinema; artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the digital’s wider relationship to the real; the proliferation of cinematic screens and platforms; changes in methods of production, acting, and distribution; and the development of computer generated imagery, effects, and animation.

LMC 3306 I – Science, Technology, and Race

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joycelyn Wilson
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm
Catalog Info: Examines specific historical and contemporary constructions of race, within the prevailing scientific theories and ideologies in order to determine the role played by "race" in scientific and technological culture.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: "Hip Hop Culture and the Politics of Social Justice"

The course is designed around the catalogs of three hip hop artists and their music. The selected artists and their performance practices are reframed as case studies for undergraduate students to examine relationships between culture, media, social justice, race, and technology. The course emphasizes pedagogical performance and how these artists play a critical role in the African American traditions of “message music”. The course interrogates its social politics, problematizes it lapses, investigates its notions of Black joy and self-expression, and discusses the ideal of civil rights from the perspective of the South and Atlanta as a “city too busy to hate”.

LMC 3308 HP – Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Catalog Info: Surveys the emergence of ecocriticism as an analytical framework for interpreting the verbal and visual rhetorics of environmentalism in both western and nonwestern cultures.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: “Urban Environments: Humans, Birds, Dwellings”

Restricted to students enrolled in the GT Honors Program only.

We will research West Side urban environments (human and bird). Students will study buildings on that tell an interesting story— not necessarily historical, but rather local with a story worth preserving. They will gather and edit content—audio, video, photographs, texts—and design a birdhouse that replicates the building’s architecture and at the same time will attract a specific native bird species. These houses will be placed on or near the beltline and will include links to an app which, when connected, will tell the passerby the story of the building, its environment, and about the birds. Students will work with a variety of media forms to tell the human and avian stories and will also use a range of digital fabrication techniques to build the houses.

LMC 3310 B – The Rhetoric of Scientific Inquiry

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: MWF 11:15 am - 12:05 pm
Catalog Info: This course takes as its subject the ways in which argumentative and persuasive discourse is used to create and disseminate scientific knowledge.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Instructor: D. Young

How do we do science? We can see it as a tool that helps us understand the world around us and we know that those with special training can do science, but what about everyone else? Science is more than a method. It is a way of seeing the world. This course examines how scientific professionals work with knowledge and the essential role of communication in disseminating that knowledge to broader audiences. Throughout the semester, we will discuss:
• What makes an argument scientific? Is it simply because the content is scientific?
• How does scientific inquiry overlap with the public? More importantly, how do we talk about science to the public?
• Why should science professionals be considered technical communicators and what role do professional technical communicators have in this work?

Walking through real world case studies, we will study how scientific inquiry is strategically developed for multiple audiences and the obstacles we encounter in framing it; however, we will also discuss the role of technical communicators in these processes. Specifically, we will discuss how technical communicators shape scientific arguments for multiple audiences and purposes.

LMC 3314 D – Technologies of Representation

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Location: Skiles 002
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: Explores historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by technologies of representation, including written, spoken, and gestural languages; print, painting, and illustration; still and moving photography; recorded sound; and computer-mediated communications and interactive digital media.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This course considers the impact of new technologies of representation by examining the way in which satire has been presented and shaped across different forms of media and technology over the past three hundred years. Satire, perhaps more than any other genre, has proved extremely adaptable, equally at ease in poetry and pamphlets in the eighteenth century, political prints and caricatures in the nineteenth century, and film, television and digital forms in the twentieth century and today. How is “satire,” as a genre, different when it appears in print and film? Can we really talk about “A Modest Proposal,” Cruikshank’s prints, and The Onion as part of the same project? Do different technologies open up different aspects of satire itself? We will read and watch various satirical works, from “MacFlecknoe” and The Importance of Being Earnest to The Daily Show and Clickhole.

LMC 3512 G – British and Continental Romanticism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Brandy Blake
Location: Cherry Emerson 320
Days and Times: MWF 12:20 pm - 1:10 pm
Catalog Info: Examines British and Continental Romanticism as it appeared during the latter part of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: The Romantic period (end of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th century) focused on the emotional intensity and imaginative exploits of individuals. The Romantic Hero is passionate, intense, and proud [Psst, … so was Satan.] Romantic artists believed in the revolutionary spirit of humanity [Well, except for women and most slaves.]. They believed in scientific inspiration [I think you mean, “Oh crap, what did I just loose upon the world?!”]. They saw nature as beautiful and awe-inspiring [And harsh, unforgiving, and destructive]. Dude, stop it, you’re totally destroying this picture of Romanticism I’m trying to create. [Welcome to Romantic Irony.]
In this class, we’ll be looking into to the contradictions and dual consciousness of Romanticism and how those contradictions are really what makes Romanticism the special, beautiful snowflake that it is. [insert side-eye emoji here]

LMC 3705 H – Principles of Information Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Yanni Loukissas
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: TR 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Catalog Info: Presents principles and practices guiding the development of emerging digital genres. Emphasis on maximizing the affordances of the computer in organizing and communicating complex information.
Description: In our data-driven society, it is too easy to assume the transparency of data. Instead, we should approach data sets with an awareness that they are created by humans and their dutiful machines, at a time, in a place, with the instruments at hand, for audiences that are conditioned to receive them. All data are local. The term data set implies something discrete, complete, and portable, but it is none of those things. Using a range of data sources important for understanding the state of public life in the United States—scientific collections, repositories of cultural history, archives of the news, and online marketplaces—this course demonstrates how to analyze data settings rather than data sets. Students will learn to combine data visualization with qualitative inquiry into the knowledge systems behind data. Prior experience with programming is welcome but not required.

LMC 3823 B – Special Topics in Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Location: D.M. Smith 304
Days and Times: MWF 11:15 am - 12:05 pm
Catalog Info: Examination of one or more topics of current interest in literary and culture studies.
Description: "Spatial Studies in Russian Media"

Spatial Studies in Russian Media follows authors, their protagonist, filmmakers and journalists through Russian’s cities and countryside, its peripheries and the vast spaces of Siberia, while orienting students in spatial studies, the environmental humanities and theories of globalization. We will be thinking spatially and, ultimately, globally about Russian media and culture, considering how Russia’s imperial and Soviet pasts and its location between east and west can inform discussions on the relationship between Russia and the world. As students explore the spaces of Russia through literature, film and mass media, they also become cultural anthropologists, negotiating their own spatial situation and considering how to create sustainable relationships with Russia and its people.

LMC 3823 D – Special Topics in Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Engr Science & Mech 202
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: Examination of one or more topics of current interest in literary and culture studies.
Description: "As Others See Us: Literature of the Arab-Israeli Conflict"

The course presents fiction, poetry, and film from Palestinian and Israeli writers Mahmoud Darwish, Etgar Keret, Emile Habiby, Ghassan Kanafani, A.B. Yehoshua, and others - all translated to English from Arabic and from Hebrew. Intended for students with no previous background in the subject, the course provides the Israel-Palestine conflict's basic history, examines the perceptions and assumptions of all parties to it, and welcomes Israelis and Palestinians as class guests.

LMC 3823 D2 – Special Topics in Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Swann 320
Days and Times: TR 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Catalog Info: Examination of one or more topics of current interest in literary and culture studies.
Description: "Russian Modernist and Dystopian Fiction"

Russian modernist fiction has often explored dystopias, philosophical, social and political. In this course, we examine these modernist fictions, the challenges to reading they present and the mosaics of significance they generate when read through the lenses and strategies they themselves proffer to the reader. As we look at both philosophical and political dystopias – including the granddaddy of all modern dystopian novels, Evgeny Zamyatin’s We – we consider what unites and distinguishes these works. Throughout, the texts challenge narrow interpretations. Tendencies and developments which, when abstracted, provoke dystopian thinking are drawn not only from the discourse and realities of existence under the Communists. There is also the uncultured insularity of the provincial prerevolutionary town (Sologub), the dehumanization of industrial engineering and “Taylorism” in the West (serving as a complement to prescient extrapolations of Socialist thinking and reflecting Zamyatin’s a stint as a ship-building engineer in England during World War I), scientific inquiry (Bulgakov), or bourgeois conformism and vulgar self-satisfaction (Nabokov).
Most of the works we will read are both modernist and dystopic. Two, however challenge the boundaries. We start with a primer in reading modernist texts from one of the great masters of modernism – Vladimir Nabokov. His novel The Defense is, however, not a dystopia, unless the “bad place” we explore is the inside of the chess-player Luzhin’s head. The final novel, The Slynx by Tatiana Tolstaya (2000), which draws upon and interacts with some of the works we will read earlier in the semester, tests boundaries between modernism and postmodernism.

LMC 4100 F – Seminar in Science, Technology, and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 9:30 am - 10:45 am
Catalog Info: A capstone seminar to the major, this course will ask students to draw upon their training in order to engage topical issues in the cultural studies of science.
Description: “Environmental Philosophy in the 21st Century: Capitalism, Science, Nature”

The recent IPCC report on climate change brings yet another dire warning about impending environmental catastrophe and the end of the world. Learning to live in the Anthropocene is a subject taken up by a number of 21st century philosophers. This seminar will study some of the significant voices in this debate, including Bruno Latour, Isabelle Stengers, Anna Tsing, and Donna Haraway. We will also examine materials from the British Dark Mountain Project, and some writers of the “Southern Turn” (South American anthropologists and philosophers training their eyes on the industrial west) such as Eduardo Kohn, Deborah Danowski and Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. The topic of the seminar projects will be “Representing the Atlanta Anthropocene.”

LMC 4602 N – Performance Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: TR 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Catalog Info: Practical experience and theoretical investigations in theater and performance including acting, directing, designing, playwriting, performance art, performance, and new media.
Description: Instructors: P. Auslander & M. Foulger
Contact melissa.foulger@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit.

"Film Acting and the Film Industry"

Over the past several years, Atlanta has become a hub for film production at all levels, ranging from local independent productions all the way up to high-budget Hollywood film and television productions, creating significant opportunities for those interested in working in this industry.
This workshop-based course is intended for the student with some acting experience who is interested in exploring these opportunities, especially from the actor’s point of view. Topics to be explored include:
· Acting for the Camera
· Casting/Auditioning
· The Actor’s Tool Kit (Head Shot, Resume, Reel, etc.)
· The Structure of the Film Industry
· The History of Film Acting

Class sessions will be divided between hands-on workshop sessions and lecture/discussion sessions. Students will participate as actors in a series of production exercises.
Required work will include both written and performance assignments. You will also be required to investigate the local film industry at first hand, which may require some modest expense as for a head shot and membership in a casting website (think of this as a lab fee!).

LMC 4720 H – Interactive Narrative

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joycelyn Wilson
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 3:00 pm - 4:15 pm
Catalog Info: Examines significant examples of this emerging genre, including its roots ini experimental uses of older media, and engages students in creating their own interactive narrative.
Description: Examines significant examples of this emerging genre, including its roots in experimental uses of older media, and engages students in creating their own interactive narrative.
Students create their own interactive narratives as a means of exploring and expanding the representational power of the form. The goal of this course is to further the development of this new storytelling medium by analyzing, mastering, and expanding the conventions of narrative structure that make for expressive and coherent form. Students will analyze existing stories and create their own interactive narratives. This is a studio course, with regular assignments and design critiques.

LMC 4813 JAH – Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jillann Hertel
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 9:30 am - 10:45 am
Catalog Info: Class and credit hours equal last digit in course number. Topics of current interest not covered in the regular course offerings.
Description: Art of the Industry is a course designed to examine your past, present, and future frameworks in relationship to purpose, career, and participation in the current social systems that exist in the real-world when you set off from college to support yourself through your work.
Students will have completed packages and have a fluid understanding of how to represent themselves and their talents through resume, cover letters, interviews, portfolios, and more. This course explores our social systems and our motivations in a more in-depth and personalized way than other typical approaches to career preparedness. We dig for what it means to begin supporting one’s self through work and particularly in a time when the practical is nuanced with engrained desires for meaning and fulfillment.
This course is participation-based and attendance is required. The course is part lecture, part studio, part critique, and part discussion. Guest speakers from various industries will visit, as well us visiting industry partners (and alums) around metro Atlanta. Students will be required to give 1 TED-style ‘talk’ and to complete a personal package as well as a final 5-page paper. Readings are required throughout. There will be class-projects which will require production, writing, design, or other contributions specific to skills development and portfolio building.