LMC Course Descriptions

 

LMC 2200 – Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Susana Morris
Catalog Info: This course introduces the cultural concept of gender, examining topics such as biology and gender, social constructions of gender, and the psychology and sexual roles.
Description: This course introduces the cultural concept of gender, examining topics such as biology and gender, social constructions of gender, patriarchy, intersectionality, and other topics through the lens of women’s and non-binary people’s science fiction and fantasy.

LMC 3202 – Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Catalog Info: Examines the elements of fiction and what has made fiction, especially the novel, distinctive, popular, and enduring. Readings may include formal, cultural, and historical theories.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This course will examine two related genres: spy stories and detective fiction. Sharing a similar parentage (Poe's Dupin stories, Kipling, etc.), the two forms are often lumped together in bookstores and critical studies, but there are important differences between the two. Why did the two forms emerge when they did, and why did they grow apart? How have spy and detective stories changed over the past 150 years? Why do they remain so popular? We will read works by authors from Conan Doyle to Le Carre, and we will grapple with characters ranging from Sherlock Holmes to James Bond to Jason Bourne.

LMC 3206 – Studies in Communication and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joycelyn Wilson
Catalog Info: Examines ways in which forms and media of communication create and are created by other cultural constructs.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: The course will examine ways in which forms and media of communication create and are created by other cultural constructs. Students study significant arts movements, literary traditions, technological innovations, and aesthetic trends in media, emphasizing their cultural implications and impact.

LMC 3214 – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Catalog Info: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This class will introduce students to the literary and cultural history of science fiction (SF). We will examine how SF artists have developed a generic “grammar” (including specific themes, characters, story types, and stylistic rules) to speculate about the future of science, technology, and society. We will also examine how this grammar changes over time, as SF artists respond to the aesthetic and technoscientific issues of their historic and cultural moments.

LMC 3215 – Science Fiction Film TV

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Catalog Info: This course investigates science fiction as the genre developed during film history and has become one of the most popular forms of television narrative.
Description: This course examines a specific strand of global cinema, as it surveys how various cultures (outside the US) have contributed to the development of the science fiction film. In its modern form, science fiction--both literature and film--was often championed as representing a kind of international language, a way of speaking across cultures by using the common modern discourse of science. This course explores that notion by considering a variety of international works under three headings: 1) the possibility of changes in society and culture wrought by our science and technology; 2) the impact of forces outside the human realm, including encounters with alien beings and other worlds; and 3) technological alterations in or substitute versions of the self. There will be daily screenings of films or clips, we shall read material on the science fiction film, and we shall discuss the various films and readings.

LMC 3226 – Major Authors

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Brandy Blake
Catalog Info: An examination of the works and career of a major author in historical and cultural context.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Can you believe six impossible things before breakfast? Are you willing to go amongst mad people? In this class, we will examine the works of Lewis Carroll – from his children’s books to his nonsense poetry, his letters to his photography. We will discuss his significance in the Victorian period (responses and imitators), the cultural impact of his works (from Salvador Dali to Hot Topic), modern interpretations of the Alice stories (movies, video games, young adult series, etc.), and his legacy (was he a gentle deacon or a drug addict, pedophile, or secret ladies’ man?).

LMC 3252 – Studies in Film and Television

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Catalog Info: Prerequisite: LCC 2400 or LCC 2500

Explores in depth a theoretical issue central to film and/or television. Among its concerns are authorship, genre theory, spectatorship, ideology, narrative theory, and the relationship between these media and social history.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Federico Fellini’s films surreal yet earthy films have earned the adjective Felliniesque. This course will trace Fellini’s work from Italian Neorealism to Surrealism following a thread of his fascination with the circus. Finally we will look at Cinema Paradiso which examines the Italian love of the village cinema.