LMC Course Descriptions

 

LMC 2000 – Introduction to Literature, Media, and Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15
Catalog Info: As the introductory course to LMC, this course introduces students to key texts and modes of analysis associated with the study of literature, film, digital media, and communication. Course Prerequisite: English 1102.
Description: Course restricted: Only LMC majors This course will examine methods of literary, cultural, historical, and theoretical analysis, applying them to works from the early modern period up to the contemporary era. After a methodological introductory unit, the course will proceed chronologically, with classes revolving around “keywords” as a way of focusing on the unique, cross-disciplinary ways in which humanities research is conducted in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. We will look at works by Shakespeare, Hitchcock, Rushdie, and many others, from numerous cultural and national backgrounds. The goal is to help you leave this course with a solid background in literary and cultural history and analysis, a broad yet focused knowledge of critical and theoretical methodologies, and an understanding of the value and power of humanistic inquiry.

LMC 2000 – Introduction to Literature, Media, and Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Narin Hassan
Location: Skiles 246
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45
Catalog Info: As the introductory course to LMC, this course introduces students to key texts and modes of analysis associated with the study of literature, film, digital media, and communication. Course Prerequisite: English 1102.
Description: Course restricted: Only LMC majors

LMC 2200 – Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MW 3:00-4:15
Catalog Info: This course introduces the cultural concept of gender, examining topics such as biology and gender, social constructions of gender, and the psychology and sexual roles.
Description: This course explores concepts in gender and sexuality, particularly those relating to LGBTQIA histories, perspectives, debates, and cultures in the U.S.

LMC 2400 – Introduction to Media Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 170
Days and Times: MWF 9:05-9:55
Catalog Info: This course offers an introduction to the historical development and cultural impact of various forms of media: print, radio, television, film, and interactive electronic applications.
Description: Course restricted: Only LMC majors

LMC 2500 – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Qi Wang
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: MW 8-9:15
Catalog Info: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Description: Screenings: M 4:30-6:30 Skiles 368 This course aims to introduce you to the informed pleasure of appreciating and thinking about film as a unique, hybrid and evolving modern art. Issues to be lectured, screened and discussed include cinematic time, space, narrative, mise-en-scène, editing, sound, color, genre, film auteur, etc. We will discuss representative works from world cinema (e.g. US, China, UK, France, South Korea, etc.) that accentuate or innovate selective elements of filmmaking.

LMC 2500 – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 9:05-9:55
Catalog Info: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Description: Screenings T 3-5 Skiles 368

LMC 2661 – Theatre Production: Set Design and Construction

Credit Hours: 1
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Days and Times: SUN 1:00-5:00pm
Catalog Info: Meeting times vary. Course carries 1 semester hour of credit.
In this "hands on" course, students learn theatrical construction and painting techniques while building scenery for DramaTech productions.

LMC 2662 – Theater Production II: Lights, Properties, and Costumes

Credit Hours: 1
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Catalog Info: Meeting times vary. Course carries 1 semester hour of credit.
In this "hands-on" course, students create the lighting, property, and costume effects for two DramaTech productions.
Description: SAT 1:00-5:00pm TBA

LMC 2700 – Introduction to Computational Media

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Yanni Loukissas
Days and Times: MW 1:55-2:45 Boggs B9
Catalog Info: Introduction to key concepts, methods, and achievements in computational media, and the convergence of digital technology with cultural traditions of representation.
Description: (MW 1:55-2:45 Boggs B9) (F 1:55-2:45 Skiles 271) It is not often that human cultures invent new media of representation. The computer is a powerful example that has quickly assimilated older representational forms including spoken language, printed text, drawings, photographs, music and moving images. But the computer is not just an aggregator of old formats; it brings its own representational powers as well as new genres, such as data art, video games, social robots, and interactive storytelling. This course will approach the computer as a medium of expression, connected to the history of media while evolving its own characteristic forms. LMC 2700 is the introductory course for the Computational Media degree and an elective course for LMC students with a Media Studies specialization. Students will read, discuss and write about key developments in the history of computation media. Moreover, they make their own computational artifacts using a variety of programming languages including Java and JavaScript. Basic experience with programming is expected of all participants in the course.

LMC 2720 – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Firaz Peer
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 357
Catalog Info: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Description: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a "language"?

LMC 2720 – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Bolter
Days and Times: MW 9:30-10:45 Skiles 357
Catalog Info: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Description: Course restricted: Only CM majors in Phase 1 Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a "language"?

LMC 2730 – Constructing the Moving Image

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: MWF 12:20-1:10
Catalog Info: Provides the student with the conceptual, formal, aesthetic, and technical approaches to reconsider film, videos, and animation within the context of emerging digital forms.
Students learn to further the development of new, digital forms of the moving image by analyzing. mastering, and expanding its conventions. Students will engage in continual creation, experimentation, and analysis. This is a studio course, with regular design assignments and design critiques. The course includes work in montage editing, camerawork, storyboarding, advanced editing, streaming video, and interactive video.
Description: Course restricted: Only CM majors.

LMC 2813 – Special Topics in Science, Technology and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: MWF 11:15-12:05
Catalog Info: Study of one or more topics of current interest in the area of science, technology, and culture.
Description: Intro to Games Design

LMC 3102 – Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 156
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15
Catalog Info: Explores the definition and transmission of science and technology within Greek, Arabic, and Medieval Latin contexts.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Description: We will examine the Classic Scientific and Cultural Tradition from Greek philosophy to the Middle Ages. Readings will contextualize this tradition, examining, for example, interactions with theological traditions

LMC 3108 – Science, Technology, and Enlightenment

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: TR 1:30-2:45
Catalog Info: Considers the conceptual reformulation of the internal and external world urged by the sciences, technology, and culture of the Enlightenment.
Description: Science, Technology, and the Enlightenment (Technologies of Enlightenment Communication) This course looks at the transformation of various modes of cultural communication during the Enlightenment, focusing on six different material technologies: paper, engraving, medals, signs, puppets, and needlework. It serves as an introduction to eighteenth-century British and American literature, art, music, architecture, and culture; it also introduces students to the “material turn” in media and literary studies. The course includes field trips to various Atlanta cultural institutions and culminates with students presenting their own, self-made example of one of the communicative objects we have studied.

LMC 3110 – Science, Technology, and Romanticism

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: MWF 12:20-1:15
Catalog Info: Examines the relationships among romantic ideology, science, and literature, including Romanticism's imaginative responses to Enlightenment science and the Industrial Revolution.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Course Description: After introducing the notion of Modernity, this class offers a rapid survey of cultural and techno/scientific activity (mostly British) from the 18th century to the mid-19th century. This is the period of the Enlightenment or Age of Reason, and of the Romantic movement which was an aesthetic/philosophical reaction to the Age of Reason. We will spend much of the course reading poetry by some major Romantic poets – Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats – while exploring the economic, political, and aesthetic context of that canonical literary work. Learning Outcomes: Students will have a sense of the material and economic foundations of the world-view of the rationalist Enlightenment, and of the complex dialectical (resistant/complicit) response to that worldview known as Romanticism.

LMC 3112 – Evolution and the Industrial Age

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Location: Skiles 246
Days and Times: TR 12-1:15
Catalog Info: Connects later nineteenth century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: This class focuses on the rise of industrialism and colonialism in the nineteenth century and connects later nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the fiction and poetry of the long nineteenth century. Students will read from the works of Charles Darwin and his contemporaries and analyze the representation of science and technology in short stories, novels, poetry, and scientific prose. Discussion will focus especially on how science and social values overlap, particularly in narrative representations of ethnicity, gender, and class.

LMC 3202 – Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Nihad Farooq
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45
Catalog Info: Examines the elements of fiction and what has made fiction, especially the novel, distinctive, popular, and enduring. Readings may include formal, cultural, and historical theories.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Studies in Fiction: Social Justice and the Graphic Novel

LMC 3204 – Poetry and Poetics

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 3:00-4:15
Catalog Info: A study of traditions of poetic practice and poetic theory in English, in conjunction with a weekly workshop session centered on the student's own poetry.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

LMC 3206 – Studies in Communication and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joycelyn Wilson
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 3-4:15
Catalog Info: Examines ways in which forms and media of communication create and are created by other cultural constructs.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Course restricted: Only CM LMC majors Using Film and Documentary to Explore the History of Hip Hop Culture

LMC 3206 – Studies in Communication and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Krystina Madej
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: MW 9:30-10:45
Catalog Info: Examines ways in which forms and media of communication create and are created by other cultural constructs.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Social Media

LMC 3208 – African-American Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Susana Morris
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 1:30-2:45pm
Catalog Info: Explores the works of African-American writers from the Colonial period to the present and examines a variety of cultural constructs that have fundamentally shaped the African-American literary tradition.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Contemporary Black Women Writers This course focuses on the canon of contemporary Black literature by exploring how Black women write about what it means to be Black and a woman in the twenty-first century, particularly in the era of #BlackLivesMatter and #SayHerName. We will examine contemporary Black literary and cultural movements through an exploration of fiction, film, drama, poetry, and nonfiction, while paying close attention to the various historical and social contexts the works influence and emerge from. Expect to read such authors as Nicole Dennis Benn, Brittney Cooper, Tayari Jones, Janet Mock, and Natasha Tretheway, among others.

LMC 3214 – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 246
Days and Times: TR 3:00-4:15pm
Catalog Info: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

LMC 3226 – Major Authors

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 1:55-2:45
Catalog Info: An examination of the works and career of a major author in historical and cultural context.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Major Author: Major American Poets Course Description: Modern Poetry in English is for the most part poetry rooted in the British Romantic lyric of the late 18th/early19th century. Although we will not study that movement in any detail, we will explore its legacy in late 19th and 20th century American poetry. The class will focus more on close reading and analysis of specific poems than on the generalities of literary history, although that history will not be ignored. Learning Outcomes: By course’s end students will have acquired significant practice in reading and interpreting modern lyric poetry, employing an approach that links interpretation very closely to forms and patterns found in the text of the poem itself. Students will learn that poetry is not a mysterious form of expression, but is rather a form that directly rewards alert attention to its careful, complex use of language.

LMC 3228 – Shakespeare

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 1:30-2:45
Catalog Info: An examination of Shakespeare's works with attention to generic conventions, historical context, and the relationship of text and performance. Major works of Shakespeare's contemporaries are studied as appropriate.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: With a firm foundation in the written text, we will also explore performance text as interpretation, and both traditional and contemporary theoretical approaches to the plays.

LMC 3234 – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 3:00-4:15
Catalog Info: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

LMC 3234 – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 9:30-10:45am
Catalog Info: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Contact jc.reilly@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit This semester's creative writing class will focus on screenwriting, and students will write scripts for several 3-5 minute short films, which will then be "optioned" to be filmed in LMC 3406 Video Production in a subsequent semester. We'll do writing exercises geared to developing character, plot, conflict, genre, story, etc., as well as learning to use script writing software, reading some scripts for inspiration, "recreating" film scripts based on what we see on screen, adapting stories for the screen, sharing scripts for peer review, critiquing current films, and possibly watching film clips as appropriate.

LMC 3253 – Animation

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MWF 11:15-12:05
Catalog Info: This course examines animation from its earliest days as a “cinema of attractions” to its current development as a predominantly digital practice.

LMC 3258 – Documentary Film

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 3-4:15
Catalog Info: Documentaries.
Description: Using Film and Documentary to Explore the History of Hip Hop Culture

LMC 3259 – Experimental Film and Video

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Gregory Zinman
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 12-1:15
Catalog Info: NULL
Description: Screenings: T 3-5 Skiles 371 This course provides an overview of experimental moving images from the European "city symphonies" and abstract films of the 1920s to the flowering of the American postwar avant-garde; from the advent of video art in the 1960s to the online viral videos and digital gallery installations of today. The class thus surveys the artists, institutions, and viewers that have fostered moving image art throughout the history of film, and asks students to consider the historical, social, and institutional forces that have engendered oppositional, political, and aesthetically radical cinemas. A central premise of the course is that technological developments such as video and new media are not historical ruptures, but rather, part of an ongoing tradition of moving-image art making. Other core topics will include the consideration of the meaning and use-value of the avant-garde, the issue of “artists’ film and video” as opposed to “experimental film,” and the thorny relationship between avant-garde and commercial filmmaking.

LMC 3262 – Performance Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Philip Auslander
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 1:55-2:45pm
Catalog Info: An examination of cultural theories of performance and their application to the analysis of specific performative events.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Performance Studies: Seminar: Music and Performance Studies: Rock Music to the 1970s We will look at the first half of the development of rock music from roughly 1945-1977 from historical, social, musical, and performance perspectives. Areas of focus will include: The evolution of the rock band from earlier configurations of musicians beginning with swing and post-war dance bands; The evolution of rock instrumentation from saxophone dominated R&B to guitar dominated rock; The evolution of the vocal harmony group from gospel through doo wop and girl groups to the Beach Boys and the Mamas and the Papas; The waxing and waning of spectacle and theatricality in the performance of rock music; The changing social identities and roles of musicians and audiences; The role of media, including sound recordings, film, radio, jukeboxes, and 
television, in the evolution and dissemination of rock music; Specific musical genres, including jump blues, blues, rockabilly, surf, rock n roll, rock, folk-rock, psychedelic rock and hard rock. 
 Overall, the course will be structured as a traditional diachronic narrative within which we will examine each decade synchronically. Many topics include case studies in which we will focus in greater detail on a particular issue or artist, particularly artists whose careers reflect transitional moments in the history of the music. Because this course is offered under the rubric of Performance Studies, it will emphasize the visual and performance aspects of rock and related genres at all historical moments, as well as the music itself and the circumstances of its performance.

LMC 3302 – Science, Technology, and Ideology

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: TR 1:30-2:45pm
Catalog Info: Examines specific scientific, philosophical, and literary/cultural texts in order to determine the role ideology plays in the construction of culture, especially scientific and technological culture.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Description: Spanish artist Francisco Goya famously (in 1799) titled one of his etchings “The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters,” and the image depicts a sleeping artist surrounded by creatures associated in Spanish folk tradition with mystery and evil. The title, is often read as a proclamation of Goya’s adherence to the values of the Enlightenment—without Reason, evil and corruption prevail. This class examines how prevailing ideologies in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries result in the creation of various literary and/or artistic monsters: the vampire, the werewolf, and mummy, and the creature. Students will read Frankenstein, Carmilla, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Jewel of Seven Stars as well as various theoretical works that examine feminist ideology, Marxist ideology, and post-colonial ideology. Students will then explore the GT Archives to see how these 19th-century monsters are re-imagined in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will demonstrate their proficiency in both written and oral forms, including essay exams, presentations to the class, and wikis.

LMC 3304 – Science, Technology, and Gender

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45
Catalog Info: Examines specific philosophical, scientific, and cultural texts to determine the role that gender has played in the scientific and technological knowledge, currently and historically.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Fourth Street Houses Stein Study Lounge Students in this course will analyze scientific, literary, and historical representations of women as medical caregivers, patients, scientific researchers, and technologists and consider political and ethical issues related to gender and theories and practices of science and engineering. In analyzing how cultural myths of gender influence the development and reception of art, science, and technology, we will consider how social inequalities affect representations of science and technology and their deployment. Case studies will include examples from the history of science and medicine, domestic architecture and technologies, and reproductive technologies. Satisfies Humanities and Ethics Requirements.

LMC 3308 – Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15pm
Catalog Info: Surveys the emergence of ecocriticism as an analytical framework for interpreting the verbal and visual rhetorics of environmentalism in both western and nonwestern cultures.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Limited to Honors Program students, Environmentalism and Ecocriticism—The Cultural History of Trees, A Hands-on Learning Project Wood has been the most important material in the history of human technological practices, yet today it seems to have been reduced to crooked 2x4s sold at the local home center. This seminar will examine trees and lumber as they function in human technological practices and in our culture. We will study how trees figure in current debates about the environment, including tree structure and forest composition, trees and the law, and arguments about plant intelligence. Not content with just reading about trees, we will also do some woodworking. On consultation with the operators of the Georgia Tech Day Care center in Home Park, the class, will design, fabricate, and install structure(s) for the children’s playground made from the wood of an old pecan tree recently taken down at the center. The design process will include hand drawing and modeling as well as CADing, some 3d printing, and perhaps some CNC fabrication in addition to using traditional tools (hand saws, planes, draw knives, broad axes, chisels). Some texts will include works by Joan Maloof, Eduardo Kohn, and the newly published novel The Canopy by Richard Powers.

LMC 3314 – Technologies of Representation

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Michael Nitsche
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 3:00-4:15pm
Catalog Info: Explores historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by technologies of representation, including written, spoken, and gestural languages; print, painting, and illustration; still and moving photography; recorded sound; and computer-mediated communications and interactive digital media.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: “A puppet is a thought in your hand.” (Robert Moore) How can our thoughts and expressions materialize in another media form? To answer this, we turn to puppets as media objects. Puppets might be the ultimate threshold object: they connect our own life to mystical storyworlds through foam, felt, wood, textiles, and bits. They operate along a fine line between “alive” and “dead,” “object” and “subject.” We will combine elements of performance with making and crafting to investigate puppets from multiple perspectives. And we will discuss and analyze them in past and present media formats from classic shadow theater to today’s video game. This class will combine practice and theory. We will discuss different puppet traditions touching on readings from Performance Studies, Media Studies, and Critical Craft/ Making. In parallel, we create own prototypes as critical responses to our discussions. Students should expect to discuss readings, design and develop own prototypes, and be able to critically review their work throughout in class discussions. The course should be interesting for students interested in physical media and experimental media design.

LMC 3318 – Biomedicine & Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45
Catalog Info: Discusses the history of biology and medicine; popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; and the cultural implications of medical imaging technologies.
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement
Description: This course discusses the history of medicine and medical technologies; literary and popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; ethical issues related medicine and public health; and the cultural conditions affecting the development of medicine and medical technologies. Subjects include the Tuskegee syphilis study and the establishment of bioethics, the race among researchers to discover the HIV virus causing AIDS, sustainability and public health and patients’ rights and genetic technology. Attributes: Humanities, Ethics

LMC 3402 – Graphic and Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Mark Leibert
Location: Skiles 346
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15pm
Catalog Info: Introduction to fundamentals of graphic and visual design of print and digital media. Familiarity with use of the World Wide Web, page layout, and computer graphic software is recommended.
Description: Course restricted: Only LMC majors.

LMC 3403 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: TyAnna Herrington
Location: Skiles 246
Days and Times: TR 0130-0245pm
Catalog Info: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Description: LMC 3403 provides information regarding the principles and concepts of technical communication and creates opportunities for students to practice technical communication skills in developing proposals, analytical reports, and related oral presentations. Students will work in experiential settings to develop materials, gather responses, and engage in critical analyses while pursuing analytical projects. Beginning with the premise that technical communication exists only within contextual situations, and both uses and creates information designed for specific purposes in specific communities (those already existing within organizations as well as those created for a unique purpose), this course asks students to explore both primary and secondary research venues to analyze situations and audiences in their own disciplines to create documents and oral presentations which communicate through effective structure, prose, and visual presentation. Students will learn to analyze and produce functional documents that reflect the results of critical analyses and other pertinent experience. The assignments will include an annotated bibliography, a well-developed analytical report, a proposal, and an oral presentation. The course will cover foundational use of technical communication's theoretical principles and concepts, treating analyses of epistemological grounding for rhetorical purposes—both analytical and productive—visual rhetoric/document design, ethics, intellectual property, usability testing, and audience issues. The required course products are all functional in nature and replicable for different purposes once students leave Georgia Tech.

LMC 3403 F – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45am
Catalog Info: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Description: Community, Sustainability, Engagement Technical communication involves a variety of stakeholders and many types of information strategies and communication practices. This class serves as an introductory survey to this fascinating and complex field. In taking this class, you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies related to specific project types, develop competencies in audience awareness and situational analysis, enhance your already existent research and design skills, and engage in reflection about your results. You will extend your problem-solving skills by working, both individually and in a small group, on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres and issues. Throughout the semester, you will develop a range of multimodal artifacts, including but not limited to memos, presentations, brochures and/or flyers, manuals, and reports. At the end of the semester, you should be able to demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. This section of Technical Communication is organized around the ideas of community, sustainability, and engagement. These are important concepts given that the technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This semester’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator, aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community. We will discuss these concepts more in class and will also have readings, available via our course website, for you to read prior to completing work for our clients this semester. When creating your deliverables this semester, you will be looking more closely at various initiatives that Georgia Tech participates in on a regular basis relating to the concept of STEAM and sustainability. STEAM stands for Science, T

LMC 3403 K – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 8:00-9:15am
Catalog Info: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Description: Community, Sustainability, Engagement Technical communication involves a variety of stakeholders and many types of information strategies and communication practices. This class serves as an introductory survey to this fascinating and complex field. In taking this class, you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies related to specific project types, develop competencies in audience awareness and situational analysis, enhance your already existent research and design skills, and engage in reflection about your results. You will extend your problem-solving skills by working, both individually and in a small group, on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres and issues. Throughout the semester, you will develop a range of multimodal artifacts, including but not limited to memos, presentations, brochures and/or flyers, manuals, and reports. At the end of the semester, you should be able to demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. This section of Technical Communication is organized around the ideas of community, sustainability, and engagement. These are important concepts given that the technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This semester’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator, aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community. We will discuss these concepts more in class and will also have readings, available via our course website, for you to read prior to completing work for our clients this semester. When creating your deliverables this semester, you will be looking more closely at various initiatives that Georgia Tech participates in on a regular basis relating to the concept of STEAM and sustainability. STEAM stands for Science, T

LMC 3406 – Video Production

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Thornton
Location: Skiles 355
Days and Times: MW 3-4:15
Catalog Info: An introduction to video production including basic skills in storyboarding, scripting, filming, editing, and sound.
Description: This course is a hands-on introduction to film and video production. Through theoretical and practical application of the production process, you will learn techniques for producing a short film, while developing an expressive use of the filmmaking medium. Throughout the course, students will have several opportunities to collaborate and critically explore the entire production process, to gain understanding of the artistic roles of the key members of a film production crew.

LMC 3410 – The Rhetoric of Nonlinear Documents

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebecca Burnett
Location: Hall 106
Days and Times: TR 09:30-10:45 am
Catalog Info: Focuses on the rhetorical problems posed by hypertext documents. Emphasis in designing for multiple audiences, page and document design, and navigation in a nonlinear environment.

LMC 3412 – Communicating Science and Technology to the Public

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: MW 3-4:15
Catalog Info: Examines both the theoretical and practical issues involved in communicating scientific and/or technological material to a variety of lay audiences.
Description: Sci/Tech Journalism

LMC 3414 – Intellectual Property: Policy and Law

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: TyAnna Herrington
Location: Skiles 271
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15pm
Catalog Info: This course introduces students to intellectual property issues, focusing on ways that policy shapes national character and on application of constitutional and statutory law.
Description: Students will examine constitutionally informed policy and pragmatic legal issues in intellectual property law, focusing on the effects of power structures and information digitization. Students will master foundational understanding of intellectual property law as it affects/will affect them in their development of creative work. The course primarily provides an overview of the constitutional policy and law that drives copyright as a general structure. But it also covers statutory areas of the law that make up intellectual property, such as the protections for intellectual property: trademark, reputation and goodwill, trade secret, patent, and copyright. The range of discussion in each of these areas is determined by student interests and by their contributions, which complement regular course material.

LMC 3518 – Literary and Cultural Postmodernism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andy Frazee
Location: Skiles 270
Days and Times: TR 12-1:15
Catalog Info: A survey of major themes, representational techniques, and social and cultural concerns of postmodern art and literature.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: In surveying the major themes, representational techniques, and social and cultural concerns of postmodern art and literature, this course will pay special attention to the ways that science, technology, and media have contextualized and influenced the fiction, poetry, nonfiction, electronic literature, and theory of the late-20th and early-21st centuries. In studying postmodern literature, we will necessarily begin with understanding the basics of modernist literature and theory and how postmodernism responds to the modernist precedent. From there we will trace a roughly chronological path through the past 60 or so years of literary and cultural history, exploring such important topics as the influence of the nuclear age on postwar literature; the rise of "theory" writ large and its effect on literary production; and the ways that computers and the Internet have suggested new possibilities and new challenges for human thought and literary production. Authors we will read include the likes of Juan Luis Borges, Don DeLillo, Maxine Hong Kingston, Salmon Rushdie, and John Ashbery; we will also conisder thinkers such as Marshall McLuhan, Donna Haraway, and Jean Baudrillard.

LMC 3661 – Theater Production III: Management

Credit Hours: 1
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Catalog Info: Meeting times vary. Class carries 1 semester hour of credit.
In this "hands-on" course, students will create and execute a publicity campaign and operate the box office for DramaTech productions.
Description: Course meets in DramaTech theater.

LMC 3662 – Theater Production IV: Acting

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Catalog Info: Meeting times vary. Class carries 1 semester hour of credit.
This course provides students an opportunity to perform on stage in a production at DramaTech. Auditions are required.

LMC 3705 – Principles of Information Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Nassim Jafarinaimi
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 3-4:15
Catalog Info: Presents principles and practices guiding the development of emerging digital genres. Emphasis on maximizing the affordances of the computer in organizing and communicating complex information.

LMC 3710 – Principles of Interaction Design

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: MW 3:00-4:15pm
Catalog Info: Examines principles of design for shaping the procedural and participatory affordances of digital environments, emphasizing the role of cultural context and media transitions.
Description: Course restricted: Only CM majors.

LMC 4100 – Seminar in Science, Technology, and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 12:00-1:15pm
Catalog Info: A capstone seminar to the major, this course will ask students to draw upon their training in order to engage topical issues in the cultural studies of science.
Description: STaC Seminar: Surveillance and Culture

LMC 4200 – Seminar in Literary and Cultural Theory

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Richard Utz
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 9:30-10:45am
Catalog Info: Concentration on a single literary or cultural theorist and/or a major school of literary or cultural theory. Schools of theory that will be considered include, among others, Materialist, Feminist, Structuralist, Post-Structuralist, and Cultural Studies.
Description: Global Medievalism In this seminar, we want to explore the world-wide existence of medievalism, a cultural phenomenon that encompasses all creative and critical receptions, reimaginations, and reenactments of medieval culture in postmedieval times. Specifically, we want to investigate the causes for the continued fascination with medieval culture, from European colonialism and ‘Western’ economic, military, and cultural influence through the various transformations and adaptation of ‘real’ and ‘invented’ medieval ideas, tropes, and memes in countries, regions, and cultures in which there never was a ‘middle age’. This is a cultural studies class, and so it unites research and scholarship on art, social class, culture, film, literature, media, music, politics, race, and technology to help us discuss how cultural practices and ideas about the ‘medieval’ travel through time and space. Our goal is to answer complex questions at the intersection of various disciplines, theories, and cultural and linguistic traditions. Our travels will be local-to-global, beginning in Atlanta, and then on from ‘palm to pine’. Among the topics we might discuss are: why Unite the Right demonstrators in Charlottesville, NC, wielded medievalist shields and symbols; why Putin’s Russia celebrates its medieval heritage; and why the reception of Ridley Scott’s movie, Kingdom of Heaven, is different in the Middle East than in Britain.

LMC 4500 – Seminar in Film Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Thornton
Catalog Info: An in-depth investigation of a major movement, theory, period, or technological development in film studies

LMC 4600 – Seminar in Performance Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Philip Auslander
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 1:55-2:45
Catalog Info: An in-depth investigation of a specific issue or theme in performance studies.
Description: Seminar: Music and Performance Studies: Rock Music to the 1970s We will look at the first half of the development of rock music from roughly 1945-1977 from historical, social, musical, and performance perspectives. Areas of focus will include: The evolution of the rock band from earlier configurations of musicians beginning with swing and post-war dance bands; The evolution of rock instrumentation from saxophone dominated R&B to guitar dominated rock; The evolution of the vocal harmony group from gospel through doo wop and girl groups to the Beach Boys and the Mamas and the Papas; The waxing and waning of spectacle and theatricality in the performance of rock music; The changing social identities and roles of musicians and audiences; . The role of media, including sound recordings, film, radio, jukeboxes, and television, in the evolution and dissemination of rock music; Specific musical genres, including jump blues, blues, rockabilly, surf, rock n roll, rock, folk-rock, psychedelic rock and hard rock. In many cases, we will focus in greater detail on a particular issue or artist, particularly artists whose careers reflect transitional moments in the history of the music. Because this course is offered under the rubric of Performance Studies, it will emphasize the visual and performance aspects of rock and related genres at all historical moments, as well as the music itself and the circumstances of its performance. This course will be conducted as much as possible as a seminar, meaning that a high level of student participation in discussion is expected. Assignments include multiple seminar presentations and a final project/presentation on a topic in the history of rock music and its performance. Students taking the course under this number as a senior seminar will have additional assignments.

LMC 4602 – Performance Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Days and Times: TR 1200-0115pm
Catalog Info: Practical experience and theoretical investigations in theater and performance including acting, directing, designing, playwriting, performance art, performance, and new media.
Description: Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course. Contact melissa.foulger@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit. Course meets in DramaTech Theater. Based on the Ferst Center’s “I Feel Safe When” initiative, students will work with embedded artists in the areas of storytelling, Viewpoints (Overlie/Bogart/Landau), Rasaboxes (Schechner) , and Theatre of the Oppressed (Boal). After work in the core tenets of each practice, students will work together to create a devised theatre piece that deals with their personal stories related to safety on Georgia Tech’s campus in one of the following areas: • Safety • People/Others • Emotional • Physical • Material • Political/Ethical • Academic Preparedness • Spiritual Group/media driven pieces will be created around the concepts of People/Others, Community, Place, Self, and Escape. Those will all areas of interest are encouraged to participate. We will be looking for technicians and designers who are fully embedded into the process to help build the world of the play (possibly in multiple locations). The show will then rehearse in January for a February presentation to the Georgia Tech community as part of DramaTech's season.

LMC 4720 – Interactive Narrative

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Janet Murray
Location: Skiles 02
Days and Times: TR 1:30
Catalog Info: Examines significant examples of this emerging genre, including its roots ini experimental uses of older media, and engages students in creating their own interactive narrative.
Description: The larger objective of this course is to contribute to the expansion of human expressive powers by creating and critiquing artifacts that exploit the affordances of the emerging digital medium for the purposes of the ancient human practice of storytelling.

LMC 4725 – Game Design as a Cultural Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Bogost
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 9:30
Catalog Info: Emphasis is on the design elements common to games and the expressive possibilities and cultural concerns specific to digital games. Students analyze games as cultural artifacts and gameplay as a patterned cultural experience similar to theater, music, and other participatory creative activities. The emphasis is on the design elements common to games, from ancient board games to computer games, and the expressive possibilities and cultural concerns specific to digital games. The course includes theoretical readings and close analysis of specific games. The course will consider the primary theoretical contexts for understanding games, including anthropological, biological, sociological, aesthetic, and literary frameworks. It will include the close analysis of influential and representative games from ancient times to the present, and will engage students in design exercises and in the creation of original digital games.

LMC 4730 – Experimental Digital Art

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joycelyn Wilson
Location: Skiles 308
Catalog Info: Provides students with key conceptual, formal, aesthetic and technical elements needed in creating artifacts in areas ranging from augmented and mixed reality to scientific visualization.
Students examine the conceptual, formal, aesthetic and technical basics of creating and analyzing digital, artistic artifacts in areas of: virtual, augmented and mixed reality; ubiquitous and distributed computing; networks; tangible objects; physical and physiological computing; social computing; information and scientific visualization; and artificial intelligence. The course includes analysis, experimentation, creation, and critique of artistic projects and short analytical papers. Numerous areas of converging and diverging issues among artistic and scientific knowledge bases will be explored, in order to understand how emerging technologies and critical practices may offer us ways to reshape and rethink the world.
Description: MW 3:00-4:15pm

LMC 4813 – Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 4:30-5:45pm
Catalog Info: Class and credit hours equal last digit in course number. Topics of current interest not covered in the regular course offerings.
Description: Wearable Technology