LMC Course Descriptions

 

LMC 2100 – Introduction to Science, Technology and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rachel Dean-Ruzicka
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 423
Days and Times: TTH 2:35-4:25
Description: As the introductory course to the major in Science, Technology and Culture, this course explores the ways in which disciplines construct and represent the knowledge they generate.

LMC 2200 – Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Susana Morris
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 10:05-11:55
Description: This course introduces the cultural concept of gender, examining topics such as biology and gender, social constructions of gender, and the psychology and sexual roles.

LMC 2400 – Introduction to Media Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Yanni Loukissas
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MW 2-4:30
Description: This course offers an introduction to the historical development and cultural impact of various forms of media: print, radio, television, film, and interactive electronic applications.
Catalog Info: How have contemporary media, such as comics, film, literature, video games, data visualization, and architecture, been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge those conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze media representations of the earth, nature, sustainability, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across domains: a film by Hayao Miyazaki, a short story by Ursula K. La Guin, an interactive narrative by Jeremy Mendez and Leanne Allison, an installation by Natalie Jeremijenko, a landscape by James Corner. The class will focus on unraveling various configurations of nature and technology in environmentalist creations and exposing their broad social, cultural and political implications. Such configurations might take the form of subject and frame, field and object, original and copy, native and foreign, or non-human and human. Moreover, we will engage with emergent work that seeks to complicate such oppositions as well as speculative practices that move beyond the role of critique. The class will make use of theory from both Media Studies and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) to motivate a series of short essays and media collecting projects throughout the term. This course is part of the Ignite program in Urban Sustainability.

LMC 2500 – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 2:35-4:25
Description: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Catalog Info: This course serves as an introduction to film studies and related visual representation. First emphasis will be on film narrative, how stories are narrated with pictures. We will look as well at film genres and generic expectation as well as the historical origins of narrative cinema. Text: Film Art: An Introduction 11th Edition, Bordwell and Thompson THE FILMS North by Northwest (Hitchcock) 1959 131 minutes Sunset Boulevard (Wilder) 1950 110 minutes Singin’ in the Rain (Donen, Kelly) 1952 103 minutes Children of Men (Cuarón) 2006 109 minutes No Country for Old Men (Coen Brothers) 2007 122 minutes Wings of Desire (Wenders) 1987 128 minutes Breathless (Godard) 1960 90 minutes The Triplets of Belleville (Chomet) 2003 80 minutes In the Mood for Love (Kar Wai Wong) 2000 98 minutes A Documentary TBA

LMC 2661 – Theatre Production: Set Design and Construction

Credit Hours: 1
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Days and Times: SUN 1:00-5:00pm
Description: Meeting times vary. Course carries 1 semester hour of credit.
In this "hands on" course, students learn theatrical construction and painting techniques while building scenery for DramaTech productions.

LMC 2662 – Theater Production II: Lights, Properties, and Costumes

Credit Hours: 1
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Days and Times: SAT 1:00-5:00pm
Description: Meeting times vary. Course carries 1 semester hour of credit.
In this "hands-on" course, students create the lighting, property, and costume effects for two DramaTech productions.

LMC 3102 – Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 12:30-4:20
Description: Explores the definition and transmission of science and technology within Greek, Arabic, and Medieval Latin contexts.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition ("Questions of Life and Death") The single oldest surviving text (Instructions of Shuruppag) concerns itself with giving advice for the living (for example: “Nothing at all is to be valued, but life should be sweet. You should not serve things; things should serve you.” Also: “you should not boast in beer halls”). The second oldest surviving text (the Pyramid Texts) concerns itself with giving advice for the dead (in the afterlife, the deceased Pharaoh should show his superiority to the gods by “cooking meals of them in his dinner pots”). What is the point of living? What is the significance of death? How should one live or die? Do our acts echo after us, or must we live only for the present moment? This course will look at the earliest considerations of how human beings might best behave during life, and what they might expect after death. Greek and Roman society will lie at the heart of the course, but we will also read ancient Hebrew, Sumerian, Indian and Egyptian texts.

LMC 3112 – Evolution and the Industrial Age

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: MTWTH 2:30-3:25
Description: Connects later nineteenth century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: GA Tech Lorraine Study Abroad Connects nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age. Subjects for this iteration of the course include industrialism, artistic and poetic depictions of revolution, war, and Romanticism; scientific accounts of evolution by natural selection; and evolutionary themes in naturalist fictions. Attributes: Humanities (Global Perspectives)

LMC 3202 – Studies in Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Narin Hassan
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: TR 10:05-11:55
Description: Examines the elements of fiction and what has made fiction, especially the novel, distinctive, popular, and enduring. Readings may include formal, cultural, and historical theories.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Studies in Fiction: Global Science Fiction This class will explore science fiction (SF) as a variety of texts that enable people to talk about their experiences with science and technology across centuries, continents, and cultures. In the first unit, we will explore the history and critical vocabulary of science fiction as it has developed in Europe and the United States over the past two hundred years. In the second unit, we will examine the transition from nationally- to globally-oriented science fiction through a case study of black speculative fiction, beginning with nineteenth-century African American alternate histories and extending to present-day African science fiction. In the third and longest unit, we will continue our study of science fiction from around the globe, including tales from South America, India, Russia, China, Japan, and the Middle East.

LMC 3204 – Poetry and Poetics

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Thomas Lux
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 3:30-5:20
Description: A study of traditions of poetic practice and poetic theory in English, in conjunction with a weekly workshop session centered on the student's own poetry.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Poetry and Poetics I gives Georgia Tech students the chance to discover the joy of reading poetry. This class is for everyone--both experienced readers/writers of poetry as well as those who have less familiarity with the genre. The course begins with fundamentals in understanding and appreciating poetry as we cultivate the art of close reading. Students are expected to engage actively with the texts and with each other in class discussions. Assignments include a poetry journal, two short papers, and a final project in which students find imaginative ways to celebrate poetry (e.g., a poetry reading, a painting inspired by a poem, a portfolio of original poetry, an outreach project, or a musical composition with a poem as lyrics).

LMC 3214 – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: TR 12:30-2:20
Description: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement

LMC 3215 – Science Fiction Film TV

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 10:05-11:55
Description: Specifically, it examines science fiction as it has developed during film history and as it has gradually become a popular form of television narrative.
Catalog Info: This course examines how various cultures have contributed to the development of a global science fiction media. In its modern form, SF was often championed as representing a kind of international language, a way of speaking across cultures by using the common modern discourse of science. This course interrogates that notion by considering a variety of international works under three broad headings: 1) the possibility of changes in society and culture, wrought by our science and technology; 2) the impact of forces outside the human realm, including encounters with alien beings and other worlds; and 3) technological alterations in or substitute versions of the self. Our goals are to assess the level of commonality across these three modalities of SF, to increase our understanding of the complex relationship between popular media and global cultures, and to develop skills in reading, analyzing, and interpreting film texts. There will be daily screenings of films or clips, we shall read material on SF films, and we shall discuss the various films and readings. Grades depend on a mid-term test (30%), a comprehensive final (30%) a research paper (30%), and attendance and participation (10%).

LMC 3219 – Literature and Medicine

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: TR 2:35-4:25
Description: This course examines works of literature dealing overtly with illness and healing, works about or by physicians and other caregivers, and works that raise questions about ethical behavior in the face of sickness.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: This course examines works of literature dealing overtly with illness and healing, works by physicians and other caregivers, and works that raise questions about ethical behavior in the face of sickness. We will read texts by William Carlos Williams, Albert Camus, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Margaret Atwood among others.

LMC 3234 – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Karen Head
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TTH 8:00-11:50am
Description: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info:

LMC 3256 – Major Filmmakers

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Christina Van Houten
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2500

Traces in depth an individual artist's career and affords students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the works of an important figure in the world of film.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: China Abroad Major Filmmakers--Asian Auteurs This course aims to provide an in-depth view on some of the most prominent directors from Asia. Through a combined approach of auteur and cultural studies, we will appreciate representative directors in terms of their individual styles and related national/regional histories that inform the content and form of their films. Among filmmakers to be discussed are: Akira KUROSAWA (Japan), Yasujiro OZU (Japan), HONG Sang-soo (Korea), PARK Chan-wook (Korea), LEE Chang-dong (Korea), KIM Ki-duk (Korea), Hou Hsiao-hsien (Taiwan), JIA Zhangke (China), LOU Ye (China), etc.

LMC 3258 – Documentary Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Thornton
Location: Skiles 355
Days and Times: TR 12:30-2:20
Description: Documentaries.
Catalog Info: Advanced Video Production—Documentary Documentaries help shed light on significant topics, and challenge its audiences to act on relevant issues of the day. The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the art of documentary filmmaking, and to explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking can serve as a catalyst for prompting its audiences to take action. Working in small, collaborative teams, students will learn to write and produce a 10 – minute (Poetic Mode, Observational Mode, or Performative Mode) documentary.

LMC 3314 – Technologies of Representation

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Michael Nitsche
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 2:35-4:25
Description: Explores historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by technologies of representation, including written, spoken, and gestural languages; print, painting, and illustration; still and moving photography; recorded sound; and computer-mediated communications and interactive digital media.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Technologies of Representation: Data Visualization We live in what’s been called the “golden age” of data visualization. We now routinely encounter bar charts of our step-counts, stack graphs of our debit card purchases, and network diagrams of our Facebook friends—and that is to say nothing of the complex diagrams and infographics that populate the news. Indeed, if data is the “new oil,” as it’s been described, visualization might be said to be the process by which data is converted into energy—in the form of powerful, persuasive images that, far too often, remain under-critiqued. This course will thus present a series of lenses for critiquing—and creating—data visualizations in ways that address their social, cultural, and political dimensions. We will focus on visualizations of Georgia state data, past and present, using the recently rediscovered visualizations of W.E.B. Du Bois as our point of departure. By examining these (and other) visualizations in the context of readings that engage with the various issues surrounding personal and government data, we will emerge with a deeper understanding of the power of data visualization, as well as its constraints.

LMC 3318 – Biomedicine & Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Description: Discusses the history of biology and medicine; popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; and the cultural implications of medical imaging technologies.
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: GA Tech Lorraine Study Abroad This course discusses the history of medicine and medical technologies; literary and popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; ethical issues related medicine and public health; and the cultural conditions affecting the development of medicine and medical technologies. Subjects include the Tuskegee syphilis study and the establishment of bioethics, the race among researchers to discover the HIV virus causing AIDS, sustainability and public health and patients’ rights and genetic technology. Attributes: Humanities, Ethics

LMC 3403 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 12:30-02:20pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.

LMC 3403 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: TR 10:05-11:55am
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: LMC 3403-LS: The Problem of Water Technical Communication involves communicating with a variety of stakeholders, utilizing information relayed in multiple forms. Within this class you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies, as well as develop competencies in analysis, citation, design, and reflection. You will extend problem-solving skills by working on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres. You will create multimodal artifacts that use evidence and demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. More specifically, this particular Technical Communication course is organized around the theme of water systems. As researchers at the US Geological Survey note, water is “important and basic to life.” Recent news coverage you may be aware of has focused on drought conditions, reduced water reservoirs, and contamination issues in major cities and in rural communities. This course is looking to not only raise awareness among students to the fact that many scientists, researchers, engineers, educators, and community members (including right here at Georgia Tech as part of the Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative and in the greater Atlanta metropole) are working to develop ways to grapple with a potential shortage of clean drinking water, but is also designed to get you actively engaged in this research yourself. You will be working on a variety of technical communications (including but not limited to infographics, brochure design, memos, and presentations) that will help you think more about the ways that the knowledge that you have already gained through your majors, hobbies, or other experiences may aid in this ongoing collaborative research effort. The opportunity to work on these projects and to reflect on what you have learned along the way will aid you in considering both the ethical implications of technical communications and the important social responsibil