LMC Course Descriptions

 

ENGL 1101 A – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rachel Dean-Ruzicka
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 127
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: ENGL 1101: American Murder. American culture produces and consumes murder with a ghastly enthusiasm. Castle, CSI, Law & Order, Dexter, NCIS, Criminal Minds, and Bones regularly dominate the ratings for television dramas. The Amazon.com and New York Times bestseller lists are equally stocked with tales of murder and detection. Serial killers and true crime are big business and media darlings. This section of ENGL 1101 will examine America’s fascination with murder. We will look at the history of murder in America, the genre of “true crime,” and the search for justice after murder is committed. We will complete projects that enhance your written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing a critical eye for representations of murder in popular culture. Course texts include Devil in the White City, In Cold Blood, and Just Mercy, as well as several documentary films.

ENGL 1101 D2 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Owen Cantrell
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 127
Days and Times: TR 1;30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Truthiness." In nearly every hour of every day, we are bombarded with arguments and statements meant to persuade us. Whether on television, social media, web sites, or directly from media figures and politicians, persuasive arguments based in “truth” are the coinage of the world we live in. This English 1101 course focuses on the ways in which the “truthiness” of arguments often trumps their verifiable, empirical reality. This epistemological dilemma will be explored in psychological and neuroscientific literature that presents the cognitive make up of our minds as one of the problems to our understanding of complex issues. Additionally, we will discuss the ways in which “truthiness” has infected our social and political discourse, as well as the often dramatic results that come from allegiance to “truthiness” over empirical fact. Topics will include metacognition, anti-intellectualism, political and social issues, and the tradition of anti-rationalism. Class discussions will focus on a mix of evaluation of class readings, application of concepts from class to contemporary debates, and student presentations utilizing “truthiness” as it relates the issues of the day.

ENGL 1101 D3 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jeffrey Fallis
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 131
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Sound, Silence, and the Voice." This course will serve as an introduction to multimodal communication and Georgia Tech's WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) approach to composition and critical thinking. It will do so by focusing on the intersecting and often-overlooked elements of sound, silence, recording technology, listening, and the voice, and how crucially these elements impact our communication with and understanding of the world and each other. We will read short essays on sound and voice by John Cage, David Byrne, Roland Barthes, and Federico Garcia Lorca, among others, and we will do assignments ranging from creating podcasts on the history and effect of certain sounds and voices to exercises in silent communication.

ENGL 1101 D5 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Tobias Wilson-Bates
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Designing Time." "What then is time?," ponders Saint Augustine. "If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know." In Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut writes that "All time is all time. It does not change. It does not lend itself to warnings or explanations. It simply is." And yet, despite its enduring enigma, Time is the mundane clay of the modern world, molded to organize wages, daily commutes, bedtimes, and DMV visits, among other banal activities. In this class we will use WOVEN to explore how our various conceptions of Time as such organize the ways we live and communicate at the most basic level. We will read Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five, Alan Lightman's Einstein's Dreams, and Sean Carroll's From Eternity to Here in order to develop multimodal projects organized around the principle of time as a design principle. How can we think about the processes around us operating differently by engaging different notions of time?

ENGL 1101 D7 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Fitzsimmons
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

ENGL 1101 F2 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Owen Cantrell
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 131
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Truthiness." In nearly every hour of every day, we are bombarded with arguments and statements meant to persuade us. Whether on television, social media, web sites, or directly from media figures and politicians, persuasive arguments based in “truth” are the coinage of the world we live in. This English 1101 course focuses on the ways in which the “truthiness” of arguments often trumps their verifiable, empirical reality. This epistemological dilemma will be explored in psychological and neuroscientific literature that presents the cognitive make up of our minds as one of the problems to our understanding of complex issues. Additionally, we will discuss the ways in which “truthiness” has infected our social and political discourse, as well as the often dramatic results that come from allegiance to “truthiness” over empirical fact. Topics will include metacognition, anti-intellectualism, political and social issues, and the tradition of anti-rationalism. Class discussions will focus on a mix of evaluation of class readings, application of concepts from class to contemporary debates, and student presentations utilizing “truthiness” as it relates the issues of the day.

ENGL 1101 F3 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jeffrey Fallis
Location: Skiles 171
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Sound, Silence, and the Voice." This course will serve as an introduction to multimodal communication and Georgia Tech's WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) approach to composition and critical thinking. It will do so by focusing on the intersecting and often-overlooked elements of sound, silence, recording technology, listening, and the voice, and how crucially these elements impact our communication with and understanding of the world and each other. We will read short essays on sound and voice by John Cage, David Byrne, Roland Barthes, and Federico Garcia Lorca, among others, and we will do assignments ranging from creating podcasts on the history and effect of certain sounds and voices to exercises in silent communication.

ENGL 1101 H3 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Tobias Wilson-Bates
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: TR 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Designing Time." "What then is time?," ponders Saint Augustine. "If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know." In Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut writes that "All time is all time. It does not change. It does not lend itself to warnings or explanations. It simply is." And yet, despite its enduring enigma, Time is the mundane clay of the modern world, molded to organize wages, daily commutes, bedtimes, and DMV visits, among other banal activities. In this class we will use WOVEN to explore how our various conceptions of Time as such organize the ways we live and communicate at the most basic level. We will read Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five, Alan Lightman's Einstein's Dreams, and Sean Carroll's From Eternity to Here in order to develop multimodal projects organized around the principle of time as a design principle. How can we think about the processes around us operating differently by engaging different notions of time?

ENGL 1101 HP1 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jennifer Forsthoefel
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 131
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Feminist Memoir." Feminism as a social movement has been met with both criticism and celebration, and the varying responses have spurred outcries from pop stars to politicians, igniting shifts within the movement, its social discourse, and its scholarship. In this class, we will read memoirs written by women who consider themselves feminists, including those featured in the 2007 publication The Feminist Memoir Project, as well as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Jessica Valenti, Caitlin Moran, Roxanne Gay, Queen Latifah, Lindy West, and others. We will examine these memoirs in light of feminist theory, journalism, scholarship, and various popular culture and multimedia perspectives to understand the ways in which feminism is understood and defined in the present moment. We will consider questions such as: what is feminism? What has it meant to be a feminist in the past? How is that definition similar to and different from what it means today? Who is the authority on what constitutes feminism and what makes communities identify with or distance themselves from the label “feminist”? How much do narratives or messages about feminism in media and culture affect our own experiences of it? Have these narratives or portrayals or images changed over time? As a class, we will read, view, and listen to a variety of "texts" that inquire after these issues, and we will create various artifacts (using our WOVEN curriculum) that raise questions, provide depth personally and academically, and analyze the issues and the cultural artifacts.

ENGL 1101 I – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Tobias Wilson-Bates
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 4:30pm-5:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Designing Time." "What then is time?," ponders Saint Augustine. "If no one asks me, I know what it is. If I wish to explain it to him who asks, I do not know." In Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut writes that "All time is all time. It does not change. It does not lend itself to warnings or explanations. It simply is." And yet, despite its enduring enigma, Time is the mundane clay of the modern world, molded to organize wages, daily commutes, bedtimes, and DMV visits, among other banal activities. In this class we will use WOVEN to explore how our various conceptions of Time as such organize the ways we live and communicate at the most basic level. We will read Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five, Alan Lightman's Einstein's Dreams, and Sean Carroll's From Eternity to Here in order to develop multimodal projects organized around the principle of time as a design principle. How can we think about the processes around us operating differently by engaging different notions of time?

ENGL 1101 J1 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jennifer Forsthoefel
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 127
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Feminist Memoir." Feminism as a social movement has been met with both criticism and celebration, and the varying responses have spurred outcries from pop stars to politicians, igniting shifts within the movement, its social discourse, and its scholarship. In this class, we will read memoirs written by women who consider themselves feminists, including those featured in the 2007 publication The Feminist Memoir Project, as well as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Jessica Valenti, Caitlin Moran, Roxanne Gay, Queen Latifah, Lindy West, and others. We will examine these memoirs in light of feminist theory, journalism, scholarship, and various popular culture and multimedia perspectives to understand the ways in which feminism is understood and defined in the present moment. We will consider questions such as: what is feminism? What has it meant to be a feminist in the past? How is that definition similar to and different from what it means today? Who is the authority on what constitutes feminism and what makes communities identify with or distance themselves from the label “feminist”? How much do narratives or messages about feminism in media and culture affect our own experiences of it? Have these narratives or portrayals or images changed over time? As a class, we will read, view, and listen to a variety of "texts" that inquire after these issues, and we will create various artifacts (using our WOVEN curriculum) that raise questions, provide depth personally and academically, and analyze the issues and the cultural artifacts.

ENGL 1101 J5 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rachel Dean-Ruzicka
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: ENGL 1101: American Murder. American culture produces and consumes murder with a ghastly enthusiasm. Castle, CSI, Law & Order, Dexter, NCIS, Criminal Minds, and Bones regularly dominate the ratings for television dramas. The Amazon.com and New York Times bestseller lists are equally stocked with tales of murder and detection. Serial killers and true crime are big business and media darlings. This section of ENGL 1101 will examine America’s fascination with murder. We will look at the history of murder in America, the genre of “true crime,” and the search for justice after murder is committed. We will complete projects that enhance your written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing a critical eye for representations of murder in popular culture. Course texts include Devil in the White City, In Cold Blood, and Just Mercy, as well as several documentary films.

ENGL 1101 K – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: James Howard
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 123
Days and Times: TR 8am-9:15am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Medievalist Games." In this course, we will use Georgia Tech’s WOVEN curriculum (consisting of written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal modes) to practice communication, critical thinking, and rhetorical awareness. As subject matter, we will examine the rise of popular games that adapt medieval themes. Since Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson created Dungeons and Dragons in the mid-1970s, medievalist fantasy has been a vital roleplaying game genre. Recent board games like The Resistance: Avalon and Dominion adopt broadly medievalist themes, allowing players to build villages and bring disloyal knights to justice. Why have they been so successful? What rhetorical features do these game designers consider, and what can we learn from the themes they include and exclude? We’ll tackle these question from two directions. One, we will read some popular medieval romances and adapt them for newer audiences. Two, we will examine and debate others’ adaptations. Our multimodal projects will include reviewing a game, writing a response to a researcher of medievalism, and creating a medievalist game with a specific rhetorical purpose.

ENGL 1101 L2 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jennifer Forsthoefel
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 127
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Feminist Memoir." Feminism as a social movement has been met with both criticism and celebration, and the varying responses have spurred outcries from pop stars to politicians, igniting shifts within the movement, its social discourse, and its scholarship. In this class, we will read memoirs written by women who consider themselves feminists, including those featured in the 2007 publication The Feminist Memoir Project, as well as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Jessica Valenti, Caitlin Moran, Roxanne Gay, Queen Latifah, Lindy West, and others. We will examine these memoirs in light of feminist theory, journalism, scholarship, and various popular culture and multimedia perspectives to understand the ways in which feminism is understood and defined in the present moment. We will consider questions such as: what is feminism? What has it meant to be a feminist in the past? How is that definition similar to and different from what it means today? Who is the authority on what constitutes feminism and what makes communities identify with or distance themselves from the label “feminist”? How much do narratives or messages about feminism in media and culture affect our own experiences of it? Have these narratives or portrayals or images changed over time? As a class, we will read, view, and listen to a variety of "texts" that inquire after these issues, and we will create various artifacts (using our WOVEN curriculum) that raise questions, provide depth personally and academically, and analyze the issues and the cultural artifacts.

ENGL 1101 N1 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Owen Cantrell
Location: Hall 106
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Truthiness." In nearly every hour of every day, we are bombarded with arguments and statements meant to persuade us. Whether on television, social media, web sites, or directly from media figures and politicians, persuasive arguments based in “truth” are the coinage of the world we live in. This English 1101 course focuses on the ways in which the “truthiness” of arguments often trumps their verifiable, empirical reality. This epistemological dilemma will be explored in psychological and neuroscientific literature that presents the cognitive make up of our minds as one of the problems to our understanding of complex issues. Additionally, we will discuss the ways in which “truthiness” has infected our social and political discourse, as well as the often dramatic results that come from allegiance to “truthiness” over empirical fact. Topics will include metacognition, anti-intellectualism, political and social issues, and the tradition of anti-rationalism. Class discussions will focus on a mix of evaluation of class readings, application of concepts from class to contemporary debates, and student presentations utilizing “truthiness” as it relates the issues of the day.

ENGL 1101 N5 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jeffrey Fallis
Location: Skiles 168
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Sound, Silence, and the Voice." This course will serve as an introduction to multimodal communication and Georgia Tech's WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) approach to composition and critical thinking. It will do so by focusing on the intersecting and often-overlooked elements of sound, silence, recording technology, listening, and the voice, and how crucially these elements impact our communication with and understanding of the world and each other. We will read short essays on sound and voice by John Cage, David Byrne, Roland Barthes, and Federico Garcia Lorca, among others, and we will do assignments ranging from creating podcasts on the history and effect of certain sounds and voices to exercises in silent communication.

ENGL 1102 A2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Julie Weng
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Global Modernisms in a Digital Age." The modernist movement of the early 20th century is often characterized by its break from the Victorian traditions of the 19th century, including artistic conventions in form, style, and content. James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, for instance, captured the individual’s stream of conscious thought. Instead of the conventional hero, Mulk Raj Anand depicted the most despised of figures in Indian society. Against ordinary proprieties, Marcel Duchamp exhibited a urinal as a work of art. And Filippo Tommaso Marinetti sought inspiration, not from beauty and order, but from chaos and machines. With these radical changes in art, modernism is often described more as an idea, a philosophy, an aesthetic style, rather than a movement linked to a particular geographical time and place. This course will negotiate these ideas by asking: where and when did modernism occur? Indeed, as we will explore, modernism was a global movement, spanning geographical, national, and continental boundaries, and it created a shockwave that many scholars argue reverberates still in contemporary literature and art today. We will pair our study of modernism with assignments that will challenge students to creatively represent this global movement through digital tools such as infographics, maps, word clouds, and more. These electronic creations will illuminate our course materials and expand our understanding of global modernisms themselves.

ENGL 1102 A3 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kate Holterhoff
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Victorian Age, Then and Now." In this section of ENGL 1102, students build on the critical thinking and composition strategies learned in ENGL 1101 through the creation of projects that use new media and digital technologies to study Victorian and Neo-Victorian literature, visual art, and culture. We will consider ideas about textual adaptation and interpretation in the cultural discourses of nineteenth-century Britain and the British Empire. Students will examine texts both written and set during the nineteenth-century in order to identify and understand critical themes including imperialism, race, class, and gender. Addressing questions about why the period of Queen Victoria’s reign (1837-1901) has inspired so many twenty- and twenty-first-century films, novels, artworks, and video games, will enable students in this course to generate valuable insights regarding the persistence of Victoriana. In what ways do Victorian texts seem particularly modern, and even prescient? What elements of the past do Neo-Victorian texts adopt, and what do they ignore? Does Steampunk offer a productive historical critique or is it a merely an ornamental and corporatized style? How is the ideology of the nineteenth century inscribed on its imagery, and what strategies might contemporary scholars use to interpret this facet of visual culture? Why do some plots and authors from the nineteenth century remain popular and canonical, while others have passed into obscurity? Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated on their successful engagement with course outcomes in rhetoric, process, and multimodality through the completion of written assignments as well as multimodal and digital projects.

ENGL 1102 B – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Christina Colvin
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Technocritters." "[I]t seems reasonable...that nature should produce its own automata, much more splendid than artificial ones. These natural automata are the animals." -René Descartes, 1649 "What a pity and what a poverty of spirit, to assert that beasts are machines deprived of knowledge and sentiment, which affect all their operations in the same manner, which learn nothing, never improve..." -Voltaire, 1824 How does technology impact how humans interact with, represent, and understand nonhuman animals? How do animals and our relationships with them affect the design and purposes of technology? This course will engage these and related questions by exploring fictional and nonfictional texts that depict the relationship between animals and technology in contemporary culture. With the theme of "technocritters" as a thematic guide to our literary and rhetorical analyses, we will practice how to structure and support arguments, engage in inquiry-driven research, produce meaning through situation-appropriate language, genre, and design choices, and critically reflect on our rhetorical strategies and the strategies of others. This course will train you to identify, employ, and synthesize the principles of written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication through informal and formal writing assignments, collaborative work, in-class discussion, exercises, and presentations, as well as the use of a variety of digital tools.

ENGL 1102 B1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Afflerbach
Location: Skiles 156
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Our class will explore one of the longest-lasting and most versatile genres in American literature: science fiction. Since it emerged as a distinct form in American pulp magazines of the early twentieth century, sf has continually grappled with the relationship between technology and the imagination: sometimes celebrating heroic innovation, sometimes expressing anxiety about an accelerating modernity, the genre toggles dramatically between hope and fear for humanity’s future. For this reason, sf provides an ideal platform to reflect on modern communication. In the 21st century, personal and professional communication have become fundamentally multimodal: on an everyday basis, we combine Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes. This class will introduce you to core skills for communicating in all these WOVEN modes, assign projects that ask you to synthesize them in a variety of artifacts, and provide you with a space to consider how these communication habits shape our lives. We’ll do this by considering sf stories explicitly interested in how we communicate shared values, fears, and needs in a rapidly changing society, as well as by introducing practices in the digital humanities that extend literary analysis beyond essay-writing. After looking at sf’s early and “golden” era of magazines, our class will examine landmark sf writers like Phillip K. Dick, Ursula K. Leguin, and Octavia Butler, who used the genre to critique social inequality in the United States. Finally, we’ll consider the modern medium in which sf reaches most Americans today: film. How do encounters with alien creatures in sf stories model anxieties about race or international politics? How do representations of robots or androids reflect evolving views about artificial intelligence? How can speculative fiction show us the constraints of our present, as well as help us to imagine alternate futures?

ENGL 1102 B5 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Bethany Jacobs
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Black Rhetorics of Resistance." African American literature is steeped in a tradition of resistance. Through a variety of genres, from slave narratives to pop albums, black artists in the U.S. have spent the past four hundred years articulating their resistance to systemic racist oppression. Our course will use this tradition as a lens for examining, and practicing, rhetorical strategies and modes that are at the core of Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program. In the process, we will explore essential themes of African American literature, including: the violence vs. nonviolence debate; the prison industrial complex; intersectionality; public protest; individualism vs. community; family; and love. These themes may awake passionate feelings in you, as we engage with difficult texts and distressing realities. Rather than dismiss Emotion as the weaker sibling of Reason, we will treat our emotional reactions to these texts as a sign of rhetoric at work, and as an invitation to hone critical thinking. By immersing ourselves in African American rhetorics of resistance, we will develop the skills to produce our own multi-modal communication projects.

ENGL 1102 C – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Julie Weng
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 8am-8:50am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Postcolonial Literature and Theory." During the 20th century, European empires crumbled, and colonies in Africa, South Asia, and the Caribbean fought for and attained independence. Despite these political victories, however, the inhabitants of these regions struggled to articulate their individual, cultural, and national identities. Our course will study this “postcolonial condition” through literary and theoretical texts, focusing in particular on countries once controlled by Great Britain. We will grapple with how and to what effect, as Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin describe, “the empire writes back”—ways that writers took to the page to navigate the tensions of living in a place once occupied (and often ravaged) by British imperial rule. Amidst these topsy-turvy circumstances, these writers also explore local anxieties regarding such issues as religion, gender, caste, tribe, and more. By studying a range of related creative and critical texts, we will discover that postcolonial literature and theory not only enlivens our understanding of decolonization but also enables broader studies of identity, power, and difference.

ENGL 1102 D – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Amy King
Location: Skiles 254
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Post-Colonial Hauntings." In this section of English 1102, we will engage with the theme of hauntings in post-colonial contexts. Films and writing from various cultural contexts (in Great Britain, Australia, America, and the Caribbean) will lead us to explore questions such as: How have representations of cultural “outsiders” changed throughout time? How have the literatures and artwork of colonized peoples appropriated and transformed popular myths for their own purposes? How do “the colonized” attempt to work through the unspeakable atrocities of history via representations of a haunting past? Using the novel Dracula as a starting point for our study, we will question popular understandings of how the “outsider” invades the colonial center, and from there we will move into deciphering how other “haunting” presences—such as ghosts, zombies, and vampires—in twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, poetry, and films operate within the context of empire. We will also discover that communication in these texts and contexts is rhetorical and multimodal, as people communicate in multiple ways. Building on the strategies developed in 1101, we will hone our communication abilities through practice of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) principles, while developing and exercising strategies as researchers. The projects for this course will activate all modes in WOVEN, resulting in a diverse portfolio that might include, but will not be limited to, forum responses, PowerPoint presentations, and movie trailers. By constantly looking at the “bigger picture” of colonialism, global exchange, and communities, we will situate our own WOVEN arguments in the greater conversations that have been going on for centuries.

ENGL 1102 D1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Anna Ioanes
Location: Skiles 169
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Afterlives of Slavery." Using a WOVEN approach to communication that considers the interrelationship between Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes, this course will give you practice in analyzing the rhetorical strategies of others and discerning the most successful strategies for articulating your own ideas. Emerging from Saidiya Hartman's insight that the legacy of US slavery has profoundly shaped contemporary political and cultural life, this class will explore how writers, artists, and performers respond to and remake that legacy. “Afterlives of Slavery” is a course about how our understanding of the past is mediated and even remade through cultural forms. By analyzing the rhetorical strategies and implicit arguments artists and writers make about how to represent a past that is at once inaccessible and immediate, we will hone cultural literacy and expand our repertoire of of interpretive and creative strategies. The course will consider the affordances of creative genres for responding to the social and material legacy of slavery and the ways representations shape our understanding of the contemporary world. Texts will explore the theme of US slavery in experimental, abstract, or otherwise creative ways, and will include artwork by Kara Walker, graphic novels by Kyle Baker, poetry by M. NourbeSe Philip, and films by Spike Lee. Assignments will contribute to a digital project documenting 21st-century creative portrayals of slavery's afterlives. Instructor: Anna Ioanes, PhD. Note: this course will be taught as a hybrid course, meaning that a significant percentage of class meetings will be conducted online.

ENGL 1102 D3 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Marzoni
Location: Skiles 171
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Multimodal Language of Punk Rock." Rock critic Lester Bangs, writing about the Clash for NME in December 1977, argued that, “At its best, new wave/punk represents an age-old Utopian dream: that if you give people the license to be as outrageous as they want in absolutely any fashion they can dream up, they’ll be creative about it, and do something good besides.” While punk has not been without its bitter offspring (skinheads, Avril Lavigne’s “Sk8er Boi”), its adherents have been at the vanguard of experimentation in music, literature, art, film, and fashion since the working class formation emerged, simultaneously, in London and New York in the 1970s. And though accusations of nihilism are not unwarranted, politics has been at the core of the movement since its beginnings––often divisively so. Both product of and reaction to late capitalism, punk came of age as the Cold War came to a close, providing a venue for ecstasy and rage in defiance of the new world order. As such, its chords resound familiarly in today’s unprecedented political climate. This writing and communication course will consider the multimodal language of punk rock. We will read and write about the work of punk’s foremost scholars (Bangs, Greil Marcus, Legs McNeil), memoirists (Patti Smith, Richard Hell), novelists (Kathy Acker, William Gibson, William T. Vollmann), and predecessors (Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Poe, Burroughs). We will watch and discuss films of and about the era, study zines, listen to a lot of records––from the New York Dolls to Pussy Riot––and go to a punk show. Assignments and class discussions will emphasize written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal communication, and the course will culminate in a digital portfolio.

ENGL 1102 D4 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kathy Harrison
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

ENGL 1102 F1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Marzoni
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Multimodal Language of Punk Rock." Rock critic Lester Bangs, writing about the Clash for NME in December 1977, argued that, “At its best, new wave/punk represents an age-old Utopian dream: that if you give people the license to be as outrageous as they want in absolutely any fashion they can dream up, they’ll be creative about it, and do something good besides.” While punk has not been without its bitter offspring (skinheads, Avril Lavigne’s “Sk8er Boi”), its adherents have been at the vanguard of experimentation in music, literature, art, film, and fashion since the working class formation emerged, simultaneously, in London and New York in the 1970s. And though accusations of nihilism are not unwarranted, politics has been at the core of the movement since its beginnings––often divisively so. Both product of and reaction to late capitalism, punk came of age as the Cold War came to a close, providing a venue for ecstasy and rage in defiance of the new world order. As such, its chords resound familiarly in today’s unprecedented political climate. This writing and communication course will consider the multimodal language of punk rock. We will read and write about the work of punk’s foremost scholars (Bangs, Greil Marcus, Legs McNeil), memoirists (Patti Smith, Richard Hell), novelists (Kathy Acker, William Gibson, William T. Vollmann), and predecessors (Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Poe, Burroughs). We will watch and discuss films of and about the era, study zines, listen to a lot of records––from the New York Dolls to Pussy Riot––and go to a punk show. Assignments and class discussions will emphasize written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal communication, and the course will culminate in a digital portfolio.

ENGL 1102 F2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kathy Harrison
Location: Skiles 156
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

ENGL 1102 F4 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Amy King
Location: Skiles 168
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Post-Colonial Hauntings." In this section of English 1102, we will engage with the theme of hauntings in post-colonial contexts. Films and writing from various cultural contexts (in Great Britain, Australia, America, and the Caribbean) will lead us to explore questions such as: How have representations of cultural “outsiders” changed throughout time? How have the literatures and artwork of colonized peoples appropriated and transformed popular myths for their own purposes? How do “the colonized” attempt to work through the unspeakable atrocities of history via representations of a haunting past? Using the novel Dracula as a starting point for our study, we will question popular understandings of how the “outsider” invades the colonial center, and from there we will move into deciphering how other “haunting” presences—such as ghosts, zombies, and vampires—in twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, poetry, and films operate within the context of empire. We will also discover that communication in these texts and contexts is rhetorical and multimodal, as people communicate in multiple ways. Building on the strategies developed in 1101, we will hone our communication abilities through practice of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) principles, while developing and exercising strategies as researchers. The projects for this course will activate all modes in WOVEN, resulting in a diverse portfolio that might include, but will not be limited to, forum responses, PowerPoint presentations, and movie trailers. By constantly looking at the “bigger picture” of colonialism, global exchange, and communities, we will situate our own WOVEN arguments in the greater conversations that have been going on for centuries.

ENGL 1102 G – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Krafft
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Singularity." “What, then, is the Singularity? It’s a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed.” – Ray Kurzweil, 2006 In our sections of ENGL 1102, we will consider the implications of the technological singularity, a hypothetical future when accelerating changes in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology will alter the very fabric of our world. According to writers such as Ray Kurzweil, Vernor Vinge, Sue Lange, and Greg Bear, such an event offers two potential routes for humankind: succumbing to higher forms of intelligence or evolving into cyborg or posthuman forms. We will explore the dystopian and utopian possibilities of the singularity through futurist scholarship, science fiction, and multimodal (or WOVEN) projects. Prospective projects for this course include a cyborg analysis of science fiction texts, an in-depth research project exploring contemporary technological developments that might usher in the singularity, and the creation of a speculative vision of our posthuman future.

ENGL 1102 G1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Eichel
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 131
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Monsters, Miracles, Mimesis: Fantasy and Rhetoric in Medieval Literature Are you tired of regular stories set in modern times? Do you like your fiction to feature monsters and morals? Are you a fan of any of the following: Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, superhero movies, Disney, Adventure Time? If so, this is the ENGL 1102 section for you. In this class, you will hone communication skills across the WOVEN mediums through activities and artifacts designed to improve rhetorical and stylistic skills as well as provide a firm foundation in humanities-based research. By the end of ENGL 1102, students will have experience adhering to the standards of academic English, maintaining an active blog, utilizing library and related archival technologies, and working as active members of large group projects. We will read a variety of medieval texts—from epics to riddles to recipes—alongside clips from contemporary movies and TV shows; video games, cartoons, graphic novels, and music are all fair game, ripe ground for medievalisms. Major assignments will include designing a game, producing a digital manuscript edition of a text, and creating an audio-drama. Course readings, themes, and projects will center on the ways medieval literature and contemporary medievalisms use fantasy elements and how these elements contribute to the underlying intentions of narratives. Are monsters always symbols of social angst over real-world issues? Why are there dragons on maps? Did medieval humans believe in miracles? Our readings and research will help provide answers for these and other questions. However, we will also interrogate contemporary pop culture’s obsession with all-things-medieval. From video games to the big screen, representations of the medieval have never been more popular, or lucrative. And when we do portray something even vaguely medieval, there needs to be magic alongside.

ENGL 1102 G3 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kate Holterhoff
Location: Skiles 154
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Victorian Age, Then and Now." In this section of ENGL 1102, students build on the critical thinking and composition strategies learned in ENGL 1101 through the creation of projects that use new media and digital technologies to study Victorian and Neo-Victorian literature, visual art, and culture. We will consider ideas about textual adaptation and interpretation in the cultural discourses of nineteenth-century Britain and the British Empire. Students will examine texts both written and set during the nineteenth-century in order to identify and understand critical themes including imperialism, race, class, and gender. Addressing questions about why the period of Queen Victoria’s reign (1837-1901) has inspired so many twenty- and twenty-first-century films, novels, artworks, and video games, will enable students in this course to generate valuable insights regarding the persistence of Victoriana. In what ways do Victorian texts seem particularly modern, and even prescient? What elements of the past do Neo-Victorian texts adopt, and what do they ignore? Does Steampunk offer a productive historical critique or is it a merely an ornamental and corporatized style? How is the ideology of the nineteenth century inscribed on its imagery, and what strategies might contemporary scholars use to interpret this facet of visual culture? Why do some plots and authors from the nineteenth century remain popular and canonical, while others have passed into obscurity? Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated on their successful engagement with course outcomes in rhetoric, process, and multimodality through the completion of written assignments as well as multimodal and digital projects.

ENGL 1102 G5 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Christina Colvin
Location: Skiles 156
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Technocritters." "[I]t seems reasonable...that nature should produce its own automata, much more splendid than artificial ones. These natural automata are the animals." -René Descartes, 1649 "What a pity and what a poverty of spirit, to assert that beasts are machines deprived of knowledge and sentiment, which affect all their operations in the same manner, which learn nothing, never improve..." -Voltaire, 1824 How does technology impact how humans interact with, represent, and understand nonhuman animals? How do animals and our relationships with them affect the design and purposes of technology? This course will engage these and related questions by exploring fictional and nonfictional texts that depict the relationship between animals and technology in contemporary culture. With the theme of "technocritters" as a thematic guide to our literary and rhetorical analyses, we will practice how to structure and support arguments, engage in inquiry-driven research, produce meaning through situation-appropriate language, genre, and design choices, and critically reflect on our rhetorical strategies and the strategies of others. This course will train you to identify, employ, and synthesize the principles of written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication through informal and formal writing assignments, collaborative work, in-class discussion, exercises, and presentations, as well as the use of a variety of digital tools.

ENGL 1102 H – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ruthie Yow
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Student Activism, 1960-Present. In this course, we take a multimodal and interdisciplinary ride through the major student movements of the post-war period, beginning in 1960 and making our way up to the present day. The price of the ticket is your commitment to honing, diversifying, and strengthening your own communication strategies. From the fearless nonviolent student activists of the Civil Rights era who endured beatings and bus-burnings to the bold youth of the 1999 “Battle in Seattle” who faced tear gas and riot police, American students of the modern era have a great deal to teach us. We look closely at the role of the relationship between student activism and community mobilization and examine the questions: What does “community” mean? What shapes inclusion and exclusion of particular groups and values? How has the “digital age” affected community organizing? Finally, how do activists call on pre-existing community identities and catalyze the formation of new ones in pursuit of social change? Other course aims include critical engagement with local, student-led social justice campaigns; cogent analysis of the relationship between democracy and public schooling; cultivation of a long, analytical view of student activism across time; and development of your awareness of yourself as an agent of change on campus, in Atlanta, and in the world. Students in this course will be partnering with a local organization to create youth- or social-justice-themed content that organization can use. A partnership of this kind makes for a potentially fun and engaging semester of “real world” practice– that is, your projects have stakes and audiences beyond our classroom. That being said, the work that makes this course more rewarding also makes it more challenging; please keep that truth in mind when you are deciding whether to take the course.

ENGL 1102 HP1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Marzoni
Location: Clough Commons [CULC] 125
Days and Times: TR 8am-9:15am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Multimodal Language of Punk Rock." Rock critic Lester Bangs, writing about the Clash for NME in December 1977, argued that, “At its best, new wave/punk represents an age-old Utopian dream: that if you give people the license to be as outrageous as they want in absolutely any fashion they can dream up, they’ll be creative about it, and do something good besides.” While punk has not been without its bitter offspring (skinheads, Avril Lavigne’s “Sk8er Boi”), its adherents have been at the vanguard of experimentation in music, literature, art, film, and fashion since the working class formation emerged, simultaneously, in London and New York in the 1970s. And though accusations of nihilism are not unwarranted, politics has been at the core of the movement since its beginnings––often divisively so. Both product of and reaction to late capitalism, punk came of age as the Cold War came to a close, providing a venue for ecstasy and rage in defiance of the new world order. As such, its chords resound familiarly in today’s unprecedented political climate. This writing and communication course will consider the multimodal language of punk rock. We will read and write about the work of punk’s foremost scholars (Bangs, Greil Marcus, Legs McNeil), memoirists (Patti Smith, Richard Hell), novelists (Kathy Acker, William Gibson, William T. Vollmann), and predecessors (Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Poe, Burroughs). We will watch and discuss films of and about the era, study zines, listen to a lot of records––from the New York Dolls to Pussy Riot––and go to a punk show. Assignments and class discussions will emphasize written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal communication, and the course will culminate in a digital portfolio.

ENGL 1102 HP2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Anna Ioanes
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Afterlives of Slavery." Using a WOVEN approach to communication that considers the interrelationship between Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes, this course will give you practice in analyzing the rhetorical strategies of others and discerning the most successful strategies for articulating your own ideas. Emerging from Saidiya Hartman's insight that the legacy of US slavery has profoundly shaped contemporary political and cultural life, this class will explore how writers, artists, and performers respond to and remake that legacy. “Afterlives of Slavery” is a course about how our understanding of the past is mediated and even remade through cultural forms. By analyzing the rhetorical strategies and implicit arguments artists and writers make about how to represent a past that is at once inaccessible and immediate, we will hone cultural literacy and expand our repertoire of of interpretive and creative strategies. The course will consider the affordances of creative genres for responding to the social and material legacy of slavery and the ways representations shape our understanding of the contemporary world. Texts will explore the theme of US slavery in experimental, abstract, or otherwise creative ways, and will include artwork by Kara Walker, graphic novels by Kyle Baker, poetry by M. NourbeSe Philip, and films by Spike Lee. Assignments will contribute to a digital project documenting 21st-century creative portrayals of slavery's afterlives. Instructor: Anna Ioanes, PhD. Note: this course will be taught as a hybrid course, meaning that a significant percentage of class meetings will be conducted online.

ENGL 1102 HP4 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Joseph King
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: We live in a golden age of game-making. With bevies of free video game design software, visual and audio assets, and physical game-making tools like laser and 3D printers, anyone can make games. Designers create games for all kinds of reasons, from provoking emotional reactions, to exploring concepts or ideas, to building relationships between players. This course considers game design and play as a kind of writing and writing as a kind of game design. By planning, fabricating, testing, and marketing games over the course of the semester, students will experiment with creating experiences for their audiences. Students will perform market research, make prototypes, engage in thorough user testing, produce thorough documentation, and gradually refine their polished, playable games.

ENGL 1102 HP5 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Krafft
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Singularity." “What, then, is the Singularity? It’s a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed.” – Ray Kurzweil, 2006 In our sections of ENGL 1102, we will consider the implications of the technological singularity, a hypothetical future when accelerating changes in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology will alter the very fabric of our world. According to writers such as Ray Kurzweil, Vernor Vinge, Sue Lange, and Greg Bear, such an event offers two potential routes for humankind: succumbing to higher forms of intelligence or evolving into cyborg or posthuman forms. We will explore the dystopian and utopian possibilities of the singularity through futurist scholarship, science fiction, and multimodal (or WOVEN) projects. Prospective projects for this course include a cyborg analysis of science fiction texts, an in-depth research project exploring contemporary technological developments that might usher in the singularity, and the creation of a speculative vision of our posthuman future.

ENGL 1102 I – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ruthie Yow
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 4:30pm-5:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Student Activism, 1960-Present. In this course, we take a multimodal and interdisciplinary ride through the major student movements of the post-war period, beginning in 1960 and making our way up to the present day. The price of the ticket is your commitment to honing, diversifying, and strengthening your own communication strategies. From the fearless nonviolent student activists of the Civil Rights era who endured beatings and bus-burnings to the bold youth of the 1999 “Battle in Seattle” who faced tear gas and riot police, American students of the modern era have a great deal to teach us. We look closely at the role of the relationship between student activism and community mobilization and examine the questions: What does “community” mean? What shapes inclusion and exclusion of particular groups and values? How has the “digital age” affected community organizing? Finally, how do activists call on pre-existing community identities and catalyze the formation of new ones in pursuit of social change? Other course aims include critical engagement with local, student-led social justice campaigns; cogent analysis of the relationship between democracy and public schooling; cultivation of a long, analytical view of student activism across time; and development of your awareness of yourself as an agent of change on campus, in Atlanta, and in the world. Students in this course will be partnering with a local organization to create youth- or social-justice-themed content that organization can use. A partnership of this kind makes for a potentially fun and engaging semester of “real world” practice– that is, your projects have stakes and audiences beyond our classroom. That being said, the work that makes this course more rewarding also makes it more challenging; please keep that truth in mind when you are deciding whether to take the course.

ENGL 1102 J – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kate Holterhoff
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Victorian Age, Then and Now." In this section of ENGL 1102, students build on the critical thinking and composition strategies learned in ENGL 1101 through the creation of projects that use new media and digital technologies to study Victorian and Neo-Victorian literature, visual art, and culture. We will consider ideas about textual adaptation and interpretation in the cultural discourses of nineteenth-century Britain and the British Empire. Students will examine texts both written and set during the nineteenth-century in order to identify and understand critical themes including imperialism, race, class, and gender. Addressing questions about why the period of Queen Victoria’s reign (1837-1901) has inspired so many twenty- and twenty-first-century films, novels, artworks, and video games, will enable students in this course to generate valuable insights regarding the persistence of Victoriana. In what ways do Victorian texts seem particularly modern, and even prescient? What elements of the past do Neo-Victorian texts adopt, and what do they ignore? Does Steampunk offer a productive historical critique or is it a merely an ornamental and corporatized style? How is the ideology of the nineteenth century inscribed on its imagery, and what strategies might contemporary scholars use to interpret this facet of visual culture? Why do some plots and authors from the nineteenth century remain popular and canonical, while others have passed into obscurity? Students enrolled in this course will be evaluated on their successful engagement with course outcomes in rhetoric, process, and multimodality through the completion of written assignments as well as multimodal and digital projects.

ENGL 1102 J1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Afflerbach
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Our class will explore one of the longest-lasting and most versatile genres in American literature: science fiction. Since it emerged as a distinct form in American pulp magazines of the early twentieth century, sf has continually grappled with the relationship between technology and the imagination: sometimes celebrating heroic innovation, sometimes expressing anxiety about an accelerating modernity, the genre toggles dramatically between hope and fear for humanity’s future. For this reason, sf provides an ideal platform to reflect on modern communication. In the 21st century, personal and professional communication have become fundamentally multimodal: on an everyday basis, we combine Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes. This class will introduce you to core skills for communicating in all these WOVEN modes, assign projects that ask you to synthesize them in a variety of artifacts, and provide you with a space to consider how these communication habits shape our lives. We’ll do this by considering sf stories explicitly interested in how we communicate shared values, fears, and needs in a rapidly changing society, as well as by introducing practices in the digital humanities that extend literary analysis beyond essay-writing. After looking at sf’s early and “golden” era of magazines, our class will examine landmark sf writers like Phillip K. Dick, Ursula K. Leguin, and Octavia Butler, who used the genre to critique social inequality in the United States. Finally, we’ll consider the modern medium in which sf reaches most Americans today: film. How do encounters with alien creatures in sf stories model anxieties about race or international politics? How do representations of robots or androids reflect evolving views about artificial intelligence? How can speculative fiction show us the constraints of our present, as well as help us to imagine alternate futures?

ENGL 1102 J2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Bethany Jacobs
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Black Rhetorics of Resistance." African American literature is steeped in a tradition of resistance. Through a variety of genres, from slave narratives to pop albums, black artists in the U.S. have spent the past four hundred years articulating their resistance to systemic racist oppression. Our course will use this tradition as a lens for examining, and practicing, rhetorical strategies and modes that are at the core of Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program. In the process, we will explore essential themes of African American literature, including: the violence vs. nonviolence debate; the prison industrial complex; intersectionality; public protest; individualism vs. community; family; and love. These themes may awake passionate feelings in you, as we engage with difficult texts and distressing realities. Rather than dismiss Emotion as the weaker sibling of Reason, we will treat our emotional reactions to these texts as a sign of rhetoric at work, and as an invitation to hone critical thinking. By immersing ourselves in African American rhetorics of resistance, we will develop the skills to produce our own multi-modal communication projects.

ENGL 1102 K – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Amy King
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 8am-9:15am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Post-Colonial Hauntings." In this section of English 1102, we will engage with the theme of hauntings in post-colonial contexts. Films and writing from various cultural contexts (in Great Britain, Australia, America, and the Caribbean) will lead us to explore questions such as: How have representations of cultural “outsiders” changed throughout time? How have the literatures and artwork of colonized peoples appropriated and transformed popular myths for their own purposes? How do “the colonized” attempt to work through the unspeakable atrocities of history via representations of a haunting past? Using the novel Dracula as a starting point for our study, we will question popular understandings of how the “outsider” invades the colonial center, and from there we will move into deciphering how other “haunting” presences—such as ghosts, zombies, and vampires—in twentieth and twenty-first century fiction, poetry, and films operate within the context of empire. We will also discover that communication in these texts and contexts is rhetorical and multimodal, as people communicate in multiple ways. Building on the strategies developed in 1101, we will hone our communication abilities through practice of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal) principles, while developing and exercising strategies as researchers. The projects for this course will activate all modes in WOVEN, resulting in a diverse portfolio that might include, but will not be limited to, forum responses, PowerPoint presentations, and movie trailers. By constantly looking at the “bigger picture” of colonialism, global exchange, and communities, we will situate our own WOVEN arguments in the greater conversations that have been going on for centuries.

ENGL 1102 L – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Bethany Jacobs
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Black Rhetorics of Resistance." African American literature is steeped in a tradition of resistance. Through a variety of genres, from slave narratives to pop albums, black artists in the U.S. have spent the past four hundred years articulating their resistance to systemic racist oppression. Our course will use this tradition as a lens for examining, and practicing, rhetorical strategies and modes that are at the core of Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program. In the process, we will explore essential themes of African American literature, including: the violence vs. nonviolence debate; the prison industrial complex; intersectionality; public protest; individualism vs. community; family; and love. These themes may awake passionate feelings in you, as we engage with difficult texts and distressing realities. Rather than dismiss Emotion as the weaker sibling of Reason, we will treat our emotional reactions to these texts as a sign of rhetoric at work, and as an invitation to hone critical thinking. By immersing ourselves in African American rhetorics of resistance, we will develop the skills to produce our own multi-modal communication projects.

ENGL 1102 L1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Eichel
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Are you tired of regular stories set in modern times? Do you like your fiction to feature monsters and morals? Are you a fan of any of the following: Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, Harry Potter, superhero movies, Disney, Adventure Time? If so, this is the ENGL 1102 section for you. In this class, you will hone communication skills across the WOVEN mediums through activities and artifacts designed to improve rhetorical and stylistic skills as well as provide a firm foundation in humanities-based research. By the end of ENGL 1102, students will have experience adhering to the standards of academic English, maintaining an active blog, utilizing library and related archival technologies, and working as active members of large group projects. We will read a variety of medieval texts—from epics to riddles to recipes—alongside clips from contemporary movies and TV shows; video games, cartoons, graphic novels, and music are all fair game, ripe ground for medievalisms. Major assignments will include designing a game, producing a digital manuscript edition of a text, and creating an audio-drama. Course readings, themes, and projects will center on the ways medieval literature and contemporary medievalisms use fantasy elements and how these elements contribute to the underlying intentions of narratives. Are monsters always symbols of social angst over real-world issues? Why are there dragons on maps? Did medieval humans believe in miracles? Our readings and research will help provide answers for these and other questions. However, we will also interrogate contemporary pop culture’s obsession with all-things-medieval. From video games to the big screen, representations of the medieval have never been more popular, or lucrative. And when we do portray something even vaguely medieval, there needs to be magic alongside. Despite—or because of?—our endless straining towards technological advancement, something about this period of history pulls us back.

ENGL 1102 L3 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Christina Colvin
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Technocritters." "[I]t seems reasonable...that nature should produce its own automata, much more splendid than artificial ones. These natural automata are the animals." -René Descartes, 1649 "What a pity and what a poverty of spirit, to assert that beasts are machines deprived of knowledge and sentiment, which affect all their operations in the same manner, which learn nothing, never improve..." -Voltaire, 1824 How does technology impact how humans interact with, represent, and understand nonhuman animals? How do animals and our relationships with them affect the design and purposes of technology? This course will engage these and related questions by exploring fictional and nonfictional texts that depict the relationship between animals and technology in contemporary culture. With the theme of "technocritters" as a thematic guide to our literary and rhetorical analyses, we will practice how to structure and support arguments, engage in inquiry-driven research, produce meaning through situation-appropriate language, genre, and design choices, and critically reflect on our rhetorical strategies and the strategies of others. This course will train you to identify, employ, and synthesize the principles of written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication through informal and formal writing assignments, collaborative work, in-class discussion, exercises, and presentations, as well as the use of a variety of digital tools.

ENGL 1102 L4 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Afflerbach
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Our class will explore one of the longest-lasting and most versatile genres in American literature: science fiction. Since it emerged as a distinct form in American pulp magazines of the early twentieth century, sf has continually grappled with the relationship between technology and the imagination: sometimes celebrating heroic innovation, sometimes expressing anxiety about an accelerating modernity, the genre toggles dramatically between hope and fear for humanity’s future. For this reason, sf provides an ideal platform to reflect on modern communication. In the 21st century, personal and professional communication have become fundamentally multimodal: on an everyday basis, we combine Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes. This class will introduce you to core skills for communicating in all these WOVEN modes, assign projects that ask you to synthesize them in a variety of artifacts, and provide you with a space to consider how these communication habits shape our lives. We’ll do this by considering sf stories explicitly interested in how we communicate shared values, fears, and needs in a rapidly changing society, as well as by introducing practices in the digital humanities that extend literary analysis beyond essay-writing. After looking at sf’s early and “golden” era of magazines, our class will examine landmark sf writers like Phillip K. Dick, Ursula K. Leguin, and Octavia Butler, who used the genre to critique social inequality in the United States. Finally, we’ll consider the modern medium in which sf reaches most Americans today: film. How do encounters with alien creatures in sf stories model anxieties about race or international politics? How do representations of robots or androids reflect evolving views about artificial intelligence? How can speculative fiction show us the constraints of our present, as well as help us to imagine alternate futures?

ENGL 1102 N – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Anna Ioanes
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Afterlives of Slavery." Using a WOVEN approach to communication that considers the interrelationship between Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal modes, this course will give you practice in analyzing the rhetorical strategies of others and discerning the most successful strategies for articulating your own ideas. Emerging from Saidiya Hartman's insight that the legacy of US slavery has profoundly shaped contemporary political and cultural life, this class will explore how writers, artists, and performers respond to and remake that legacy. “Afterlives of Slavery” is a course about how our understanding of the past is mediated and even remade through cultural forms. By analyzing the rhetorical strategies and implicit arguments artists and writers make about how to represent a past that is at once inaccessible and immediate, we will hone cultural literacy and expand our repertoire of of interpretive and creative strategies. The course will consider the affordances of creative genres for responding to the social and material legacy of slavery and the ways representations shape our understanding of the contemporary world. Texts will explore the theme of US slavery in experimental, abstract, or otherwise creative ways, and will include artwork by Kara Walker, graphic novels by Kyle Baker, poetry by M. NourbeSe Philip, and films by Spike Lee. Assignments will contribute to a digital project documenting 21st-century creative portrayals of slavery's afterlives. Instructor: Anna Ioanes, PhD. Note: this course will be taught as a hybrid course, meaning that a significant percentage of class meetings will be conducted online.

ENGL 1102 N2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kathy Harrison
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

ENGL 1102 Q – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Matthew Dischinger
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: MW 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Professional Writers, Professional Writing." In this course, we will read fiction by writers who worked in other professional settings while also producing fiction. We will consider the ways in which professional and technical communication might be informed by humanistic inquiry and, conversely, how fiction and literature might be informed by forms of communication that are not always seen as “creative.” Authors under consideration are a host of writers who (sometimes briefly, sometimes for quite some time) maintained careers outside of the creative writing world, such as Ralph Ellison, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Agatha Christie, Abraham Verghese, Haruki Murakami, and Toni Morrison.

ENGL 1102 S – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Matthew Dischinger
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: MW 4:30pm-5:45pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Professional Writers, Professional Writing." In this course, we will read fiction by writers who worked in other professional settings while also producing fiction. We will consider the ways in which professional and technical communication might be informed by humanistic inquiry and, conversely, how fiction and literature might be informed by forms of communication that are not always seen as “creative.” Authors under consideration are a host of writers who (sometimes briefly, sometimes for quite some time) maintained careers outside of the creative writing world, such as Ralph Ellison, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Agatha Christie, Abraham Verghese, Haruki Murakami, and Toni Morrison.

ENGL 1102 V – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Matthew Dischinger
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: MW 6pm-7:15pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Professional Writers, Professional Writing." In this course, we will read fiction by writers who worked in other professional settings while also producing fiction. We will consider the ways in which professional and technical communication might be informed by humanistic inquiry and, conversely, how fiction and literature might be informed by forms of communication that are not always seen as “creative.” Authors under consideration are a host of writers who (sometimes briefly, sometimes for quite some time) maintained careers outside of the creative writing world, such as Ralph Ellison, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Agatha Christie, Abraham Verghese, Haruki Murakami, and Toni Morrison.

LMC 2000 N1 – Introduction to Literature, Media, and Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: As the introductory course to LMC, this course introduces students to key texts and modes of analysis associated with the study of literature, film, digital media, and communication. Course Prerequisite: English 1102.
Catalog Info: LMC 2000 will address three related questions: What is literature? What are media? What is technoscience? We will examine theoretical statements and artifacts that begin the answer these questions. Readings will include Marshall McLuhan, Friedrich Kittler, Roland Barthes, Terry Eagleton, Isabelle Stengers and Bruno Latour. Students will take several tests and produce a final project.

LMC 2000 N2 – Introduction to Literature, Media, and Communication

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: As the introductory course to LMC, this course introduces students to key texts and modes of analysis associated with the study of literature, film, digital media, and communication. Course Prerequisite: English 1102.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 104 D.M. Smith. This course will examine methods of cultural analysis, and practice using those methods on works of various media from a range of historical periods. We will look at traditional literary works, films, digital media, graphic novels and other forms, with classes revolving around “keywords” as a way of focusing on the unique, cross-disciplinary ways in which humanities research is conducted in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. The goal is to help you leave this course with a solid background in literary and cultural history and analysis, a broad yet focused knowledge of critical and theoretical methodologies, and an understanding of the value and power of humanistic inquiry.

LMC 2100 G – Introduction to Science, Technology and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: As the introductory course to the major in Science, Technology and Culture, this course explores the ways in which disciplines construct and represent the knowledge they generate.
Catalog Info: This class introduces the study of science, technology, and culture (STAC). The selection of texts provides a number of approaches, strategies and tools for cultural studies of science and technology. It provides a (partial) history of Western science and technology and culture (from the early modern period to early 20th c.), and offers models of the complex and interesting ways in which social, cultural, economic, psychological, technological and scientific developments are all entangled with each other. The object of the class is for you to become familiar with these texts and this history (exams will mostly test your familiarity with the reading), and for you to apply the models implicit in this material to contemporary conditions/experiences (some class discussions and the term-long Writing Project will ask you to focus on that). Required Texts –books: Dava Sobel, William J.H. Andrewes. The Illustrated Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time Publisher: Penguin USA ; ISBN: 0802775934 Wolfgang Schivelbusch, Tastes of Paradise: A Social History of Spices, Stimulants, and Intoxicants Publisher: Vintage Books; ISBN: 067974438X Gaby Wood, Edison’s Eve: A Magical History of the Quest for Mechanical Life Publisher: Anchor; ISBN: 1400031583 William Rosen, The Most Powerful Idea in the World: A Story of Steam, Industry, and Invention University Of Chicago Press; ISBN-10: 0226726347 ISBN-13: 978-0226726342

LMC 2200 N – Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: This course introduces the cultural concept of gender, examining topics such as biology and gender, social constructions of gender, and the psychology and sexual roles.
Catalog Info: Professor Morris. See professor for course description details.

LMC 2400 J – Introduction to Media Studies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Sarah Schoemann
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: MWF 10:10am-11am
Description: This course offers an introduction to the historical development and cultural impact of various forms of media: print, radio, television, film, and interactive electronic applications.
Catalog Info: See instructor for course description details.

LMC 2500 A – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Catalog Info: Film Screening Th 3-5, Rm. 368. This course introduces students to the formal study of film art by focusing on various film types and techniques. It begins with a brief historical context, establishes a rhetoric keyed to the various techniques and technologies involved in film production, and applies that rhetoric to different film forms, including narrative, documentary, and experimental films, and it concludes with an extended discussion of film genres. Students are required to attend film screenings one day a week. We then discuss t he films in light of readings in film technique, history, and criticism from Bordwell and Thompson’s Film Art: An Introduction. Grades will depend on two tests, a comprehensive final exam, and a term paper.

LMC 2500 K – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Angela Dalle-Vacche
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 8am-9:15am
Description: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Catalog Info: Film Screenings T 3-5pm, Rm. 371. See professor for course description details.

LMC 2700 F – Introduction to Computational Media

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Ian Bogost
Location: Klaus 2443
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Introduction to key concepts, methods, and achievements in computational media, and the convergence of digital technology with cultural traditions of representation.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 2720 A – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Firaz Peer
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a "language"?
Catalog Info: See instructor for course description details.

LMC 2720 N – Principles of Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Bolter
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a "language"?
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 2813 K – Special Topics in Science, Technology and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Casey Wilson
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 8am-9:30am
Description: Study of one or more topics of current interest in the area of science, technology, and culture.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3102 N – Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Explores the definition and transmission of science and technology within Greek, Arabic, and Medieval Latin contexts.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 207 D.M. Smith. Objectives: We will examine the Classic Scientific and Cultural Tradition from Greek philosophy to the Middle Ages. Readings will contextualize this tradition, examining, for example, interactions with theological traditions. Requirements: You will be responsible for a midterm (30%), a term essay or project (40%) and a final exam(30%). Attendance is required and all absences, excused or unexcused, must be accompanied by an e-mail notification. This e-mail will also allow me to alert you to major notifications you may have missed. Substantial penalties will be exacted for substantial absences. Quizzes may be used to monitor prepared attendance. The texts assigned are required, and the appropriate texts should be brought to class. On out of class work you are held to professional standards of correctness. You are expected to have access to a writing handbook and a dictionary (hard copy or online) and thus be capable of producing an essay reflecting standard grammar, spelling, and bibliographic form. Correctness is a minimum requirement. Your effectiveness as a writer will, of course, affect your essay grades. You are expected to conform to the school’s honor code. In this class that is very simple: don’t submit work produced by someone else as your own. Special academic needs or problems should be addressed as soon as they occur. Students with school activity schedules or extensive interview schedules should submit a list of the conflicts involved. Medical problems or family emergencies creating substantial absence should be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students so that all your teachers can be notified.Confidentiality will be preserved. David Lindberg, The Beginnings of Western Science, U of Chicago Press, Edition 2 ISBN-13: 9780226482057 Plato Timaeus and CritiasPenguin Aristotle, De Anima, Penguin ISBN-13: 9780451208637 or Barnes and Noble

LMC 3108 D – Science, Technology, and Enlightenment

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Considers the conceptual reformulation of the internal and external world urged by the sciences, technology, and culture of the Enlightenment.
Catalog Info: What is the best way to communicate knowledge to a mass audience? This question, which is central to our own society, was also central to the eighteenth century, an age of scientific breakthroughs, new political philosophies, and a charged media environment. Some felt that scientific knowledge was best communicated in poetic verse (“Nurs’d by warm sun-beams in primeval caves / Organic Life began beneath the waves.”). Some felt that political philosophy was best communicated in cartoons. And some felt that entirely new forms (like novels and journalism) would have to be invented to reach a changing society. This course will look at the various ways in which eighteenth-century authors, philosophers, scientists, politicians and economists experimented with communicating knowledge to the public. A focus of the course will be literature (Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver’s Travels), but we will also look at everything from scientific writing (Newton, Hooke) to architecture to art.

LMC 3112 N – Evolution and the Industrial Age

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Connects later nineteenth century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 201 ES&M. Evolution and the Industrial Age connects later nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the fiction and poetry of the industrial period. Students will read from the works of Charles Darwin and his contemporaries and analyze the representations of science and technology in short stories, novels, poetry, and scientific prose. Special attention will be paid to how science and social values overlap, particularly in narrative representations of ethnicity, gender, and class. In addition to two essay exams, students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of the science, literature, and culture of the late nineteenth century through a range of written and oral work: timeline entries, an analytical essay, two presentations, and a collaborative archival project.

LMC 3214 HP – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: This class will introduce you to the literary and cultural history of science fiction (SF). We will examine how SF artists have developed a generic “grammar” (including specific themes, characters, story types, and stylistic rules) to speculate about the future of science, technology, and society. We will also examine how this grammar changes over time, as SF artists respond to the aesthetic and technoscientific issues of their historic and cultural moments.

LMC 3220 L – Theater III: Modern-Contemporary

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Philip Auslander
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: The dramatic literature, theory, performance practices, and historical and cultural contexts of the theater from Modernism to our contemporary period. This is NOT an acting class.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: When looking at the theatre of any era, there are multiple elements to consider: acting, playwriting, stage design and technology, methods of production, the nature of the audience and the social position of the theatre. All are important, and we will undertake a selective examination of the development of these aspects of theatre from the rise of realism and modernism in the theater of the 19th Century until now. To some degree, this iteration of this course will emphasize the history of acting as a starting point for considering all dimensions of the theatre during this span of time. The course will also reflect a bias toward American theatre, though developments in Britain and Europe will be considered. Specific topics will be selected from a menu that includes: Theatrical Realism and Anti-Realism Dramatic Genres, including the well-made play, melodrama, modern tragedy Developments in Set Design and Theater Technology Theatrical Modernism and Avant-Gardism of the Early 20th Century The Rise of the Stage Director Transitions in Acting from Declamatory to more Realistic to Method approaches Experimental Theatre, Acting, and Performance Art Movements Performance Art Musical Theatre Diverse Voices in Theatre Political Theatre

LMC 3226 L – Major Authors

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MWF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: An examination of the works and career of a major author in historical and cultural context.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: "Major Authors, James Joyce," This section of 3226 will focus on the work of James Joyce, one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. We will begin with some of Joyce’s short stories (Dubliners), then quickly read his first novel (A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man). This will prepare us to tackle Ulysses, a famously difficult novel, but (I think) as fascinating as it is difficult. Readers tend to love or hate it, finding its combination of complexity and simplicity deeply interesting or impossibly annoying. For those who love it, this novel is a work of extraordinary linguistic and intellectual and emotional energy. For others it may often seem a pointless and chaotic exercise. If you are willing and able to put in the substantial time and effort required by this course then I think you will find Ulysses among the most extraordinary novels you will ever read.

LMC 3228 D – Shakespeare

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: An examination of Shakespeare's works with attention to generic conventions, historical context, and the relationship of text and performance. Major works of Shakespeare's contemporaries are studied as appropriate.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Requirements: You will be responsible for a midterm, (30%), a term essay or project (40%) and a final exam (30%). An instruction sheet will be distributed for the term project. Periodic quizzes may be given as needed to measure reading and alertness. Satisfactory quiz grades will not alter your grade. Exceptionally proficient or deficient score s will help or harm it marginally. Attendance is required and all absences must be accompanied by a notice by e-mail. Substantial penalties will be exacted for substantial absences. The texts assigned are required, and the appropriate texts should be brought to class. You are held to professional standards of correctness on out of class work. You are expected to have access to a writing handbook and a dictionary and thus be capable of producing an essay reflecting standard grammar, spelling, and bibliographic form. You are expected to conform to the school’s honor code. In this class that is very simple: don’t submit work produced by someone else as your own. Students with school activity schedules or extensive interview schedules should submit a list of the conflicts involved. Medical problems creating substantial absence should be reported to the Office of the Dean of Students so that all your teachers can be notified. Serious personal problems requiring professional counseling and affecting classroom performance should be brought to my attention by such counselors as they occur, not at the end of the semester. Confidentiality will be preserved. OBJECTIVES: With a firm foundation in the written text, we will also explore performance text as interpretation, and both traditional and contemporary theoretical approaches to the plays. TEXTS: Signet editions of all texts have been ordered. They are reasonably priced and contain useful support material, but it is permissible to use another (accurate) edition as citations will be by act, scene and line.

LMC 3234 S – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Karen Head
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 4:30pm-5:45pm
Description: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3234 X – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: JC Reilly
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3253 B – Animation

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: This course examines animation from its earliest days as a “cinema of attractions” to its current development as a predominantly digital practice.
Catalog Info: This course surveys a specific form of animation and its place in the American film industry. It will look at examples of the “seven-minute cartoon” as it emerged in the early days of the film industry, became a standard part of the typical movie bill through the 1950s, and as it has recently been resurrected by some key animation studios, such as Disney/Pixar. We shall use this industrial development of animation as a tool for examining the emergence and characteristic work of the chief animation studios during the period of the Hollywood Studio System, and thus for helping us better understand the workings of the American film industry. Among those studios discussed are the Fleischer brothers, Ub Iwerks, the Disney studio, Warner Bros., Walter Lantz, MGM, Pixar, and others. We shall screen films each day in class(with the possibility of some being offered outside of class), read historical and theoretical work on film animation, and discuss those readings in the context of the films. Grades depend on two tests, a comprehensive final, an oral/written report, and a research paper on an instructor-approved topic.

LMC 3254 G – Film History

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Qi Wang
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2500 Surveys the history of film from its machine origins to its present digital developments. It focuses on various movements, figures, and narrative developments in world cinema.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Film Screening W 4:30-6:30, Rm. 368 This course offers a historical survey of world cinema by tracing from the very beginning of cinema’s invention to contemporary international co-productions in the 21st century. Decade by decade, we will follow cinema’s development in terms of historical and cultural contexts, technology, industrial practice, and major movements, genres, themes as well as directors. Accompanied by lectures, readings and discussions, students will view, assess, and understand canonical films from around the world in relation to their historical, industrial and cultural backgrounds. (Besides regular classes, we’ll have weekly screenings of important films as core course texts for study.)

LMC 3255 F – Cinema & Digital Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Gregory Zinman
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: This course will introduce students to the key themes, motifs, and forms of digital cinema in order to understand how technological change shapes the moving image in the present day. Prerequisites: English 1102.
Catalog Info: Film Screening T 3-5pm, Rm. 368. See professor for course description details.

LMC 3256 E – Major Filmmakers

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Qi Wang
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: MWF 3pm-3:50pm
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2500

Traces in depth an individual artist's career and affords students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the works of an important figure in the world of film.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Film Screening T 7-9pm, Rm. 371. This course aims to provide an in-depth view on some of the most prominent directors from Japan, South Korea, and China. Through a combined approach of auteurism and cultural studies, we will appreciate and discuss representative directors in terms of their individual styles and related national/regional history that inform the content and form of their works. Filmmakers to be screened and discussed include: Yasujiro OZU (Japan), Akira KUROSAWA (Japan), PARK Chan-wook (Korea), HONG Sang-soo (Korea), KIM Ki-duk (Korea), LOU Ye (China), JIA Zhangke (China), etc.. (Besides regular classes, we’ll have weekly screenings of important films as core course texts for study.)

LMC 3257 F – Global Cinema

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Angela Dalle-Vacche
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: This course examines significant movements, styles, and trends in world cinema, with an emphasis on how the global nature of contemporary film affects cultural representation. "
Catalog Info: Film Screenings W 3-5, Rm. 129 CULC. African cinema has been understood and recognized around the world most often for its powerful themes and ingeniously narrated stories. From Sembene's La Noire de ........... to Sissako's Bamako, critics and audiences in Africa and everywhere have been confronted , physically and intellectually, with the brutal presence , effects, and pain of colonialism and post-colonialism. In Wend Kuuni, Yelen, Hyenes, Touki Bouki, Yaaba, Abouna, and so many other masterpieces, those same critics , that same global audience, has been led deftly and ingeniously by master story-tellers into the inner and outer landscapes and cityscapes where African ideals, concerns, traditions, values are put into play, tested, celebrated and enjoyed. For 45 years the singular rhetoric and narrative artistry of African documentaries, animations and fictions have been unmistakable. But what of this cinema's visual textures, forms, and meanings? Critics often speak of --and spectators have been struck by--astounding images, film after film. But seldom has the complexity, the heritage, and logic of visual design of African films been fully taken into account and interpreted. In this class we shall concentrate on the relations among oral story-telling, musical rhythms, textile patterns and film-editing techniques; we shall also examine the importance of youth, vitality and children in films with non-professional actors; we shall address the use of camera movement in regard to the opposition between the village and the city and in the context of open landscapes. The syllabus will include light-hearted African comedies set in diasporic European communities as well as more serious feature films which interrogate colonial history, immigration, family relations, human behavior, moral codes, and the circulation of images between Europe and Africa.

LMC 3302 H – Science, Technology, and Ideology

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Senf
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Examines specific scientific, philosophical, and literary/cultural texts in order to determine the role ideology plays in the construction of culture, especially scientific and technological culture.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: LMC 3302: Science, Technology & Ideology examines specific scientific, philosophical, and literary/cultural texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to determine the role ideology plays in the construction of culture, especially scientific and technological culture. The course attempts to define ideology, examines the history of the term, and offers opportunities for students to engage in ideological analyses of various literary and popular texts (including material from the science fiction collection in the GT Archives). The course also examines the role of ideology in scientific texts and practices and considers science itself as an ideology that profoundly influences other cultural practices. This particular incarnation of LMC 3302 will explore various literary monsters to determine the degree to which various ideologies impacted their creation.

LMC 3304 X – Science, Technology, and Gender

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: MW 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Examines specific philosophical, scientific, and cultural texts to determine the role that gender has played in the scientific and technological knowledge, currently and historically.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Students in this course will analyze scientific, literary, historical, and visual representations of women and men as medical caregivers, patients, scientific researchers, and technologists and will consider political and ethical issues related to gender, science, and technology. We will evaluate how social inequalities related to gender affect the development and deployment of science and technology. Case studies from various countries will include examples of how gender matters in science and medicine, domestic architecture and technologies, information and computing technologies, and reproductive technologies.

LMC 3314 F – Technologies of Representation

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Krystina Madej
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Explores historical, cultural, and theoretical issues raised by technologies of representation, including written, spoken, and gestural languages; print, painting, and illustration; still and moving photography; recorded sound; and computer-mediated communications and interactive digital media.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3318 Q – Biomedicine & Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Anne Pollock
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: TR 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Discusses the history of biology and medicine; popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; and the cultural implications of medical imaging technologies.
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3402 D – Graphic and Visual Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Mark Leibert
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2100 or LCC 2400

Introduction to fundamentals of graphic and visual design of print and digital media. Familiarity with use of the World Wide Web, page layout, and computer graphic software is recommended.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3403 A – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: MWF 9:05am-9:55am
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: Technical Communication involves effectively engaging with information using strategies and practices that allow successful communication with a variety of stakeholders. By taking this class, you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies, develop competencies in analysis, citation, and design, and will engage in reflection. You will also be extending problem-solving skills by working on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres. You will also develop multimodal artifacts that use evidence and demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. More specifically, this particular Technical Communication course is organized around water systems. As researchers at the US Geological Survey note, water is “important and basic to life.” This course is looking to not only raise awareness among students to the fact that many scientists, researchers, engineers, educators, and community members (including right here at Georgia Tech as part of the Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative and in the greater Atlanta metropole) are working to develop ways to grapple with a potential shortage of clean drinking water, but is also designed to get you actively engaged in this research yourself. You will be working on a variety of technical communications (including but not limited to infographics, survey design, memos, user testing, and presentations) that will help you think more about the ways that you can aid in this ongoing effort.

LMC 3403 B – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: Technical Communication involves effectively engaging with information using strategies and practices that allow successful communication with a variety of stakeholders. By taking this class, you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies, develop competencies in analysis, citation, and design, and will engage in reflection. You will also be extending problem-solving skills by working on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres. You will also develop multimodal artifacts that use evidence and demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. More specifically, this particular Technical Communication course is organized around water systems. As researchers at the US Geological Survey note, water is “important and basic to life.” This course is looking to not only raise awareness among students to the fact that many scientists, researchers, engineers, educators, and community members (including right here at Georgia Tech as part of the Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative and in the greater Atlanta metropole) are working to develop ways to grapple with a potential shortage of clean drinking water, but is also designed to get you actively engaged in this research yourself. You will be working on a variety of technical communications (including but not limited to infographics, survey design, memos, user testing, and presentations) that will help you think more about the ways that you can aid in this ongoing effort.

LMC 3403 BA4 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Rogers
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: LMC 3403 is a professional communication course designed specifically for students in the Scheller College of Business. As such, this course is structured to provide students with a unique classroom experience which models rhetorical situations one can expect to encounter in the business world. Throughout the semester, our chief goal will be to assess each audience and rhetorical situation effectively, so that we might apply rhetorically sound principles of communication and design to each. Since effective business communication takes place on a variety of levels, this course will stress the importance of WOVEN communication. Further, the course will be divided into “modules” which allow for both individual and group development. For the first module, students will work on individual assignments that stress the principles of individual communication (both verbal and nonverbal) and document design within the workplace. For the second module, students will work individually to respond to a client’s concerns via document creation and an oral presentation. For the third module, students will be broken into small groups based on their skill sets and interests and will work on a set of assignments that stress group communication and teamwork. These small groups will function much like departments or clusters, and each student will function as an integral part of their group as it strives to address client issues and concerns in a variety of ways.

LMC 3403 BA5 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Rogers
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: LMC 3403 is a professional communication course designed specifically for students in the Scheller College of Business. As such, this course is structured to provide students with a unique classroom experience which models rhetorical situations one can expect to encounter in the business world. Throughout the semester, our chief goal will be to assess each audience and rhetorical situation effectively, so that we might apply rhetorically sound principles of communication and design to each. Since effective business communication takes place on a variety of levels, this course will stress the importance of WOVEN communication. Further, the course will be divided into “modules” which allow for both individual and group development. For the first module, students will work on individual assignments that stress the principles of individual communication (both verbal and nonverbal) and document design within the workplace. For the second module, students will work individually to respond to a client’s concerns via document creation and an oral presentation. For the third module, students will be broken into small groups based on their skill sets and interests and will work on a set of assignments that stress group communication and teamwork. These small groups will function much like departments or clusters, and each student will function as an integral part of their group as it strives to address client issues and concerns in a variety of ways.

LMC 3403 BA6 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Rogers
Location: Skiles 302
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: LMC 3403 is a professional communication course designed specifically for students in the Scheller College of Business. As such, this course is structured to provide students with a unique classroom experience which models rhetorical situations one can expect to encounter in the business world. Throughout the semester, our chief goal will be to assess each audience and rhetorical situation effectively, so that we might apply rhetorically sound principles of communication and design to each. Since effective business communication takes place on a variety of levels, this course will stress the importance of WOVEN communication. Further, the course will be divided into “modules” which allow for both individual and group development. For the first module, students will work on individual assignments that stress the principles of individual communication (both verbal and nonverbal) and document design within the workplace. For the second module, students will work individually to respond to a client’s concerns via document creation and an oral presentation. For the third module, students will be broken into small groups based on their skill sets and interests and will work on a set of assignments that stress group communication and teamwork. These small groups will function much like departments or clusters, and each student will function as an integral part of their group as it strives to address client issues and concerns in a variety of ways.

LMC 3403 G – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: Technical Communication involves effectively engaging with information using strategies and practices that allow successful communication with a variety of stakeholders. By taking this class, you will learn rhetorical and genre strategies, develop competencies in analysis, citation, and design, and will engage in reflection. You will also be extending problem-solving skills by working on a range of assignments designed to expose you to standard workplace genres. You will also develop multimodal artifacts that use evidence and demonstrate an awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design principles. More specifically, this particular Technical Communication course is organized around water systems. As researchers at the US Geological Survey note, water is “important and basic to life.” This course is looking to not only raise awareness among students to the fact that many scientists, researchers, engineers, educators, and community members (including right here at Georgia Tech as part of the Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative and in the greater Atlanta metropole) are working to develop ways to grapple with a potential shortage of clean drinking water, but is also designed to get you actively engaged in this research yourself. You will be working on a variety of technical communications (including but not limited to infographics, survey design, memos, user testing, and presentations) that will help you think more about the ways that you can aid in this ongoing effort.

LMC 3403 N – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: TyAnna Herrington
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: LMC 3403 provides information regarding the principles and concepts of technical communication and creates opportunities for students to practice technical communication skills in developing proposals, analytical reports, and related oral presentations. Students will work in experiential settings to develop materials, gather responses, and engage in critical analyses while pursuing analytical projects. Beginning with the premise that technical communication exists only within contextual situations, and both uses and creates information designed for specific purposes in specific communities (those already existing within organizations as well as those created for a unique purpose), this course asks students to explore both primary and secondary research venues to analyze situations and audiences in their own disciplines to create documents and oral presentations which communicate through effective structure, prose, and visual presentation. Students will learn to analyze and produce functional documents that reflect the results of critical analyses and other pertinent experience. The assignments will include an annotated bibliography, a well-developed analytical report, a proposal, and an oral presentation. The course will cover foundational use of technical communication's theoretical principles and concepts, treating analyses of epistemological grounding for rhetorical purposes—both analytical and productive—visual rhetoric/document design, ethics, intellectual property, usability testing, and audience issues. The required course products are all functional in nature and replicable for different purposes once students leave Georgia Tech.

LMC 3406 Q – Video Production

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Thornton
Location: Skiles 355
Days and Times: MW 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2100 or LCC 2400

An introduction to video production including basic skills in storyboarding, scripting, filming, editing, and sound.
Catalog Info: See instructor for course description details.

LMC 3410 F – The Rhetoric of Nonlinear Documents

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebecca Burnett
Location: Hall 5
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2100

Focuses on the rhetorical problems posed by hypertext documents. Emphasis in designing for multiple audiences, page and document design, and navigation in a nonlinear environment.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3414 D – Intellectual Property: Policy and Law

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: TyAnna Herrington
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: This course introduces students to intellectual property issues, focusing on ways that policy shapes national character and on application of constitutional and statutory law.
Catalog Info: Students will examine constitutionally informed policy and pragmatic legal issues in intellectual property law, focusing on the effects of power structures and information digitization. Students will master foundational understanding of intellectual property law as it affects/will affect them in their development of creative work. The course primarily provides an overview of the constitutional policy and law that drives copyright as a general structure. But it also covers statutory areas of the law that make up intellectual property, such as the protections for intellectual property: trademark, reputation and goodwill, trade secret, patent, and copyright. The range of discussion in each of these areas is determined by student interests and by their contributions, which complement regular course material.

LMC 3431 JIA – Technical Communication Approaches

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Sarah Lozier
Days and Times: M 10:10am-11am
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 320 Cherry Emerson. This course is part 2 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. In part one of the course, you selected a project, interact with the client, developed the project requirements, and prototyped the application. Additionally, you practiced and honed your abilities to analyze the technical needs of your project by researching the feasibility of several approaches and proposed the one with which you felt was most optimal. This semester, as you work toward building and delivering your project's main deliverables, you will continue revising and refining the project's goals, uses, and results through technical documentation. The course is organized by five, three-week sprints. Three of these sprints are coding intensive, during which teams are expected to accomplish demonstrable progress in coding and implementing their product/system. The semester’s major technical document is a Detailed Design explaining the architectural and information components of the team’s product/system. Students will also be asked to participate in a team Retrospective three times during the semester. These Retrospectives are valuable processes through which a team works through an understanding of their work processes and identifies areas for improvement in subsequent sprints. Project Management is an important component of the course. Teams will be asked to carefully plan, document, and manage their workflow and collaboration in order to provide a quality project on time at the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, you will be tracking and managing your work through weekly meeting minutes and Zenhub. A final presentation/demo and reflection will round out the deliverables for the course. Course Prerequisites: LMC 1102

LMC 3431 JIB – Technical Communication Approaches

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Sarah Lozier
Days and Times: M 11:15am-12:20pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 207, Architecture (East). This course is part 2 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. In part one of the course, you selected a project, interact with the client, developed the project requirements, and prototyped the application. Additionally, you practiced and honed your abilities to analyze the technical needs of your project by researching the feasibility of several approaches and proposed the one with which you felt was most optimal. This semester, as you work toward building and delivering your project's main deliverables, you will continue revising and refining the project's goals, uses, and results through technical documentation. The course is organized by five, three-week sprints. Three of these sprints are coding intensive, during which teams are expected to accomplish demonstrable progress in coding and implementing their product/system. The semester’s major technical document is a Detailed Design explaining the architectural and information components of the team’s product/system. Students will also be asked to participate in a team Retrospective three times during the semester. These Retrospectives are valuable processes through which a team works through an understanding of their work processes and identifies areas for improvement in subsequent sprints. Project Management is an important component of the course. Teams will be asked to carefully plan, document, and manage their workflow and collaboration in order to provide a quality project on time at the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, you will be tracking and managing your work through weekly meeting minutes and Zenhub. A final presentation/demo and reflection will round out the deliverables for the course. Course Prerequisites: LMC 1102

LMC 3431 JIC – Technical Communication Approaches

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Sarah Lozier
Days and Times: M 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 111 Instr. Center. This course is part 2 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. In part one of the course, you selected a project, interact with the client, developed the project requirements, and prototyped the application. Additionally, you practiced and honed your abilities to analyze the technical needs of your project by researching the feasibility of several approaches and proposed the one with which you felt was most optimal. This semester, as you work toward building and delivering your project's main deliverables, you will continue revising and refining the project's goals, uses, and results through technical documentation. The course is organized by five, three-week sprints. Three of these sprints are coding intensive, during which teams are expected to accomplish demonstrable progress in coding and implementing their product/system. The semester’s major technical document is a Detailed Design explaining the architectural and information components of the team’s product/system. Students will also be asked to participate in a team Retrospective three times during the semester. These Retrospectives are valuable processes through which a team works through an understanding of their work processes and identifies areas for improvement in subsequent sprints. Project Management is an important component of the course. Teams will be asked to carefully plan, document, and manage their workflow and collaboration in order to provide a quality project on time at the end of the semester. Throughout the semester, you will be tracking and managing your work through weekly meeting minutes and Zenhub. A final presentation/demo and reflection will round out the deliverables for the course. Course Prerequisites: LMC 1102

LMC 3432 JDC – Technical Communication Strategies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kelly Ann Fitzpatrick
Location: College of Computing [CoC] 101
Days and Times: WF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined either by a client or the team. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document. The series of deliverables students create will integrate written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) rhetorical skills for various audiences, purposes, and contexts applicable to students’ professional experiences in the workplace.

LMC 3432 JDD – Technical Communication Strategies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Casey Wilson
Location: College of Computing [CoC] 101
Days and Times: W 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined either by a client or the team. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document. The series of deliverables students create will integrate written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) rhetorical skills for various audiences, purposes, and contexts applicable to students’ professional experiences in the workplace.

LMC 3432 JDE – Technical Communication Strategies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Casey Wilson
Location: College of Computing [CoC] 101
Days and Times: W 4:30pm-5:45pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined either by a client or the team. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document. The series of deliverables students create will integrate written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) rhetorical skills for various audiences, purposes, and contexts applicable to students’ professional experiences in the workplace.

LMC 3432 JDF – Technical Communication Strategies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kelly Ann Fitzpatrick
Days and Times: WF 1:55pm-2:45pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 213 Inst. Center. This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined either by a client or the team. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document. The series of deliverables students create will integrate written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) rhetorical skills for various audiences, purposes, and contexts applicable to students’ professional experiences in the workplace.

LMC 3502 F – Ancient and Medieval Literature and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Richard Utz
Location: Skiles 269
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Introduction to Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe through an examination of one or a few major cultural conflicts expressed in the literary genres and periods.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: At first sight, few cities could have less of a link with the Middle Ages than Atlanta. Founded in 1837 to provide a train terminus to connect the port of Savannah with the Midwest, and about 3,500 miles and 400 years removed from Old Europe, Georgia’s capital seems to be quintessentially modern. Nevertheless, an alert first time visitor might notice dozens of medieval signposts: At the airport’s baggage claim, a colorful screen display invites her to be “swept away to an age of bravery and honor” and partake in “a feast of the eyes and appetite with all the splendor and romance” of medieval Spain at the Atlanta Castle of Medieval Times, a dinner theater chain.

LMC 3705 D – Principles of Information Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Yanni Loukissas
Location: Skiles 269
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm--2:45pm
Description: Presents principles and practices guiding the development of emerging digital genres. Emphasis on maximizing the affordances of the computer in organizing and communicating complex information.
Students examine the principles and practices that guide the development of emerging digital genres such as multimedia newspapers, interactive television, and networked cultural archives. Emphasis is on maximizing the use of the computer to expand the expressiveness of digital media as a means of organizing and communicating complex information. Students will learn principles of information abstraction and presentation and apply them to concrete projects, including database-driven applications, structured documents, and standardized systems of representation. Design analysis will draw on cultural critiques and design methodologies from multiple disciplines, including graphic design, computer programming, and rhetoric.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3710 H – Principles of Interaction Design

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Christopher Le Dantec
Location: Skiles 357
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-4:15pm
Description: Examines principles of design for shaping the procedural and participatory affordances of digital environments, emphasizing the role of cultural context and media transitions.
Students learn how to understand the issues involved in applying computational abstractions to culturally complex processes, to apply participatory conventions of digital and legacy media to the design of digital artifacts, and to analyze and critique their own and others' designs for their effectiveness in creating the experience of agency for the interactor. Students also examine the history and development of key conventions of interaction, and the role of multiple disciplines (HCI, graphic design, industrial design, cultural criticism) in guiding interaction design. They apply the principles of interaction design to artifacts in several genres (e.g. tools, games, web pages, installations, virtual reality), and apply an iterative design methodology and quick prototyping to problems in interaction design.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 3853 JC – Special Topics in Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: JC Reilly
Days and Times: MW 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Prerequisite: LMC 2500

Examines ine or more current topics in film studies
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 4100 F – Seminar in Science, Technology, and Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Hugh Crawford
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: TR 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2100

A capstone seminar to the major, this course will ask students to draw upon their training in order to engage topical issues in the cultural studies of science.
Catalog Info: Plant and Animal Studies The advent of the Anthropocene-- the geological era characterized by impact of humans on the geology of our planet--brings with it a recalibration of human's relationship with the natural world. In recent decades, scholars working in the fields known as Animal Studies and, more recently, Plant Studies have been grappling with that relationship. This seminar will look at some of the important figures in both fields (Donna Haraway, Cary Wolfe, Jacques Derrida etc. in Animal Studies; Antony Trewavas, Peter Wollheben, Michael Marder etc. in Plant Studies) along with some associated literature. Conducted as a seminar, students will lead discussion and will work together to formulate the terms for the seminar project.

LMC 4200 N – Seminar in Literary and Cultural Theory

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Narin Hassan
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Concentration on a single literary or cultural theorist and/or a major school of literary or cultural theory. Schools of theory that will be considered include, among others, Materialist, Feminist, Structuralist, Post-Structuralist, and Cultural Studies.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 202 ES&M. See professor for course description details.

LMC 4204 TN – Poetry and Poetics II

Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: T 3pm-5:5pm
Description: Advanced study of the traditions of poetic theory and practice with a special emphasis on processes of poetic conception and revision.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Instructor Denton. See instructor for course description details.

LMC 4602 Q – Performance Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Days and Times: MW 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Prerequisite: LCC 2600

Practical experience and theoretical investigations in theater and performance including acting, directing, designing, playwriting, performance art, performance, and new media.
Catalog Info: Professor Auslander and Foulger. See professors for course description details.

LMC 4701 A – Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 370
Days and Times: W 3pm-3:50pm
Description: Research proposal writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the preliminary (proposal writing) stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include planning, research, and documentation, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, and oral (poster) presentations. Because the course will enroll from different disciplines, you will become acquainted with research topics, ways of framing arguments, and making points outside your field of study, which will help you develop a more interdisciplinary perspective.

LMC 4701 B – Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Days and Times: T 9:30am-10:20am
Description: Research proposal writing.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 104 D.M. Smith. This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the preliminary (proposal writing) stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include planning, research, and documentation, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, and oral (poster) presentations. Because the course will enroll from different disciplines, you will become acquainted with research topics, ways of framing arguments, and making points outside your field of study, which will help you develop a more interdisciplinary perspective.

LMC 4701 C – Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: F 10:10am-11am
Description: Research proposal writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the preliminary (proposal writing) stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include planning, research, and documentation, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, and oral (poster) presentations. Because the course will enroll from different disciplines, you will become acquainted with research topics, ways of framing arguments, and making points outside your field of study, which will help you develop a more interdisciplinary perspective.

LMC 4702 A – Undergraduate Research Thesis Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: W 4:30pm-5:20pm
Description: Research thesis writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include research and documentation, journal submissions, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, and oral (powerpoint) presentations.

LMC 4702 B – Undergraduate Research Thesis Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Days and Times: R 9:30am-10:20am
Description: Research thesis writing.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 104 D.M. Smith. This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include research and documentation, journal submissions, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, and oral (powerpoint) presentations.

LMC 4702 C – Undergraduate Research Thesis Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: F 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Research thesis writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include research and documentation, journal submissions, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, and oral (powerpoint) presentations.

LMC 4720 D – Interactive Narrative

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Janet Murray
Location: Skiles 2
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Examines significant examples of this emerging genre, including its roots in experimental uses of older media, and engages students in creating their own interactive narrative.
Students create their own interactive narratives as a means of exploring and expanding the representational power of the form. The goal of this course is to further the development of this new storytelling medium by analyzing, mastering, and expanding the conventions of narrative structure that make for expressive and coherent form. Students will analyze existing stories and create their own interactive narratives. This is a studio course, with regular assignments and design critiques.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 4725 S – Game Design as a Cultural Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Laine Nooney
Location: Skiles 346
Days and Times: MW 3pm-4:15pm
Description: Emphasis is on the design elements common to games and the expressive possibilities and cultural concerns specific to digital games. Students analyze games as cultural artifacts and gameplay as a patterned cultural experience similar to theater, music, and other participatory creative activities. The emphasis is on the design elements common to games, from ancient board games to computer games, and the expressive possibilities and cultural concerns specific to digital games. The course includes theoretical readings and close analysis of specific games. The course will consider the primary theoretical contexts for understanding games, including anthropological, biological, sociological, aesthetic, and literary frameworks. It will include the close analysis of influential and representative games from ancient times to the present, and will engage students in design exercises and in the creation of original digital games.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 4730 N – Experimental Media and Digital Art

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Krystina Madej
Location: Skiles 354
Days and Times: TR 1:30pm-2:45pm
Description: Provides students with key conceptual, formal, aesthetic and technical elements needed in creating artifacts in areas ranging from augmented and mixed reality to scientific visualization.
Students examine the conceptual, formal, aesthetic and technical basics of creating and analyzing digital, artistic artifacts in areas of: virtual, augmented and mixed reality; ubiquitous and distributed computing; networks; tangible objects; physical and physiological computing; social computing; information and scientific visualization; and artificial intelligence. The course includes analysis, experimentation, creation, and critique of artistic projects and short analytical papers. Numerous areas of converging and diverging issues among artistic and scientific knowledge bases will be explored, in order to understand how emerging technologies and critical practices may offer us ways to reshape and rethink the world.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.

LMC 4813 NJ – Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Nassim Jafarinaimi
Location: Skiles 346
Days and Times: TR 12pm-1:15pm
Description: Class and credit hours equal last digit in course number. Topics of current interest not covered in the regular course offerings.
Catalog Info: See professor for course description details.