LMC Course Descriptions

 

LMC 2500 N – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Gregory Zinman
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: TR 12:00
Catalog Info: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Description: This course provides students with a number of approaches—formal, historical, and theoretical—with which to analyze cinematic form and to understand how moving images make meaning. The class begins by examining cinema’s formal elements (cinematography, editing, mise-en-scène, sound) in order to establish the necessary terminology required for the analysis of film. We then turn to the conventions and critiques of Hollywood narrative filmmaking, considering issues of genre, authorship, and ideology, before considering some alternatives (avant-garde, art cinema, other national cinemas, documentary) to dominant Western film styles. The class concludes by interrogating the quickly shifting status of the moving image in the digital age, and asking what these technological changes might indicate for cinema’s future.

LMC 3102 D – Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 270
Days and Times: TR 1:30
Catalog Info: Explores the definition and transmission of science and technology within Greek, Arabic, and Medieval Latin contexts.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Description: We will examine the Classic Philosophical, Scientific and Cultural Tradition from Greek philosophy to the Middle Ages. Readings will contextualize this tradition, examining, for example, interactions with theological traditions. Note that Science begins as Natural Philosophy

LMC 3228 H – Shakespeare

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 256
Days and Times: TR 3:00
Catalog Info: An examination of Shakespeare's works with attention to generic conventions, historical context, and the relationship of text and performance. Major works of Shakespeare's contemporaries are studied as appropriate.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: With a firm foundation in the written text, we will also explore performance text as interpretation, and both traditional and contemporary theoretical approaches to the plays. We will consider the plays as living theater.

LMC 3234 S – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MW 4:30
Catalog Info: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Instructor: Farris

Poetry & Production

This class is about learning to have a creative, productive conversation with poetry. We will be attending two requiredpoetry readings: Charles Simic on October 3 at 7 pm, and a panel of Immigrant/Refugee poets (including Ocean Vuong, Caroline Ebeid, Kaveh Akhbar, and Mai der Vang) on November 7 at 7 pm. Before the readings, we will read the poets’ work, discuss it, and write poems in response to it. At the end of the semester, you will choose a poem or sequence of poems and make a creative response to it in the medium of your choice—computer program, game, sculpture, machine, broadside, film, or anything else you can think of! Students may also choose to participate in a group project, designing and producing a chapbook that combines poetry with critical responses, photography, graphic design, and other elements dreamed up by students (and hopefully faculty) all through LMC. This will be a fun, interdisciplinary, creative class with lots of opportunities to apply your individual skill set.

LMC 3304 X – Science, Technology, and Gender

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: MW 9:30 am
Catalog Info: Examines specific philosophical, scientific, and cultural texts to determine the role that gender has played in the scientific and technological knowledge, currently and historically.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Students in this course will analyze scientific, literary, and historical representations of women as medical caregivers, patients, scientific researchers, and technologists to consider political and ethical issues related to gender and theories and practices of science and engineering. In analyzing how cultural myths of gender influence the development and reception of art, science, and technology, we will consider how social inequalities affect representations of science and technology and their reception. Case studies will include examples from the history of science and medicine, domestic architecture and technologies, and reproductive technologies.

LMC 3308 H – Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Yanni Loukissas
Location: Skiles 254
Days and Times: TR 3:00
Catalog Info: Surveys the emergence of ecocriticism as an analytical framework for interpreting the verbal and visual rhetorics of environmentalism in both western and nonwestern cultures.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: How have contemporary media (i.e. film, literature, architecture, photography, and computation) been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge these conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze representations of the earth, nature, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across media: a landscape by James Corner, a short story by Ursula K. La Guin, an installation by Natalie Jeremijenko, a film by Hayao Miyazaki, an interactive narrative by Jeremy Mendez and Leanne Allison.

LMC 3512 L – British and Continental Romanticism

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: MWF 1:55
Catalog Info: Examines British and Continental Romanticism as it appeared during the latter part of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Description: Responding to new levels of individual and social freedom in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Europe, the vanguard culture of Modernity, enters a period of revolutions—political, industrial/economic, and artistic. Romanticism is the name we give to the artistic revolution of this era. British Romanticism is notable for its poetry, and in this class we will read a number of canonical works by Romantic poets – Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. Continental Romanticism is predominately Germanic: philosophical and musical as well as literary; in this class we will pay special attention to the music of Beethoven, and to the philosophy of Hegel. We will also read Mary Shelley’s great Romantic novel Frankenstein.

LMC 4602 N – Performance Practicum

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Melissa Foulger
Days and Times: TR 12:00
Catalog Info: Practical experience and theoretical investigations in theater and performance including acting, directing, designing, playwriting, performance art, performance, and new media.
Description: Directing for the Stage. Learn the fundamentals of stage direction in this project-based class that culminates in a final performance. Topics include script analysis, staging and working with actors. Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course. Contact melissa.foulger@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit. Course meets in DramaTech Theatre.