LMC Course Descriptions

 
 
 
 
 

ENGL 1101 SF1 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lauren Neefe
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MTWR 10:05am - 11:55am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "Hear! Hear! Composition by Ear." This introduction to multimodal practices of communication and expression will emphasize the role of sound in the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, Nonverbal) approach to composition and critical thinking. Either taken for granted or else overshadowed by the visual, sound is crucial to understanding, misunderstanding, and making oneself understood. Units on listening, silence, and conversational speech will analyze primary and secondary sources as rhetorical models to be imitated and learned from as you develop the skills and strategies for an effective personal writing process. Course assignments will include an audiovisual blog reflecting on sound experiences, a silent (charades-like) performance of a thesis argument, and a group podcast on the Georgia Tech soundscape. A final portfolio will require students to collect and reflect on their best work during the term.

ENGL 1101 SF2 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jennifer Forsthoefel
Location: Hall 106
Days and Times: MTWR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: Exploring Challenges and Changes in American Higher Education This 1101 course will explore debates surrounding what higher education entails in the present cultural moment. Institutions of higher education across the country face a wide range of issues that deeply impact the lives of their students, staff, administrators, and faculties. Among those issues are: funding; financial aid; politics; sports; safe spaces; health; racial, ethnic, class, gender, and sexual identity; liberal arts training vs technical or professional training; religion; standardization; preparedness; elitism; crime; adjustment of international students; free speech; consumerism; and ideals. Our goal is to consider questions such as: What constitutes a higher education? What are the varying constituents that determine higher education in this country? Where do these constituents agree and disagree? What does the definition of higher education reveal about what this country values and does not value? How have these values changed over time? How have they remained the same? As a class, we will read, view, and listen to a variety of "texts" that inquire after these issues. While higher education is our topic, our goals concern general critical thinking and communication strategies. You will learn to think critically—that is, to separate ideas into their constituent parts, identifying their strengths and weaknesses, and learning to apply those ideas to new contexts. You will learn communication strategies that will prepare you to succeed academically at Georgia Tech and professionally in the work place. This class will introduce you to the complexities and challenges of communicating with audiences in contexts where the written word exists as part of a larger “WOVEN” framework.

ENGL 1101 SF3 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrew Marzoni
Location: Skiles 314
Days and Times: MTWR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: Reality, or the State of Things as They Actually Exist For millennia, artists and thinkers have grappled with the concept of “reality”: how to define, describe, and represent the real, or whether to reject it altogether as a fiction in itself. The internet and social media challenge us to distinguish between online existence and “IRL,” while writers of science fiction, advocates of psychedelic drug use, and physicists theorize the possibility of alternate realities. This course will approach writing and communication from the problem of reality. Topics will include realism, surrealism, neorealism, and hyperrealism in literature, philosophy, visual art, and film; reality television and virtual reality, as well as more recent inventions of contemporary politics and media: “truthiness” and “alternative facts.” We’ll read writers from Plato to Philip K. Dick, watch The Matrix and Keeping Up with the Kardashians, and even talk about science and math! Assignments and class discussions will emphasize written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal communication, and the course will culminate in a digital portfolio.

ENGL 1101 SF4 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Tobias Wilson-Bates
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: MTWR 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: What the Tech?! In this English 1101 class we will be using multimodal communication to engage with the stories and histories that inform the perception and development of the technologies that inform the modern world. Students will choose a focus technology for a three-part series of projects. The first will draw on Georgia Tech's Science and Technology archives to examine their technology's history. Next they will complete a usability study to assess its current implementation in the world, and, finally, students will evaluate its speculative future. Key texts include From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women and their Machines and James Gleick's The Information and Time Travel: A History.

ENGL 1101 SF5 – English Composition I

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: John Browning
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: MTWR 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Freshman English I.
Catalog Info: "FASHIONING MONSTERS, PRESERVING NORMALCY." “Monster,” like evil, race, or beauty, is an evolving and socially constructed category. Monsters have embodied and continue to embody whatever the dominant groups in society have feared most or considered most abnormal. This section of ENGL 1101 will focus on the conflicting dynamics in American history and culture that have shaped and reshaped our ideas about deviance and normalcy, a binary out of which our monsters are born. We will situate literary and visual narratives, commercial ads, and news stories within historical, cultural, and political contexts, allowing students to examine and write about the monster—the other—in all its many guises as an expression of cultural anxieties about race, class, sexuality, and gender. In the course of the semester, students will engage in a variety of texts and genres (Horror fiction and film, non-fiction, documentaries, etc.) and, in the process, produce various written works and multimodal artifacts that will enhance students’ written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills. Assignments and group work will require students to engage in dialogue about and argue from various viewpoints pertaining to the relationship between monstrosity and culture, thereby helping to promote our understanding of otherness and “deviant” identities.

ENGL 1102 G – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Krafft
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MWF 12:20pm-1:10pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Singularity." “What, then, is the Singularity? It’s a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed.” – Ray Kurzweil, 2006 In our section of ENGL 1102, we will consider the implications of the technological singularity, a hypothetical future when accelerating changes in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology will alter the very fabric of our world. According to writers such as Ray Kurzweil, Vernor Vinge, Sue Lange, and Greg Bear, such an event offers two potential routes for humankind: succumbing to higher forms of intelligence or evolving into cyborg or posthuman forms. We will explore the dystopian and utopian possibilities of the singularity through futurist scholarship, science fiction, and multimodal (or WOVEN) projects. Prospective projects for this course include a cyborg analysis of science fiction texts, an in-depth research project exploring contemporary technological developments that might usher in the singularity, and the creation of a speculative vision of our posthuman future.

ENGL 1102 HP5 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Andrea Krafft
Location: Skiles 371
Days and Times: MWF 11:15am-12:05pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "The Singularity." “What, then, is the Singularity? It’s a future period during which the pace of technological change will be so rapid, its impact so deep, that human life will be irreversibly transformed.” – Ray Kurzweil, 2006 In our section of ENGL 1102, we will consider the implications of the technological singularity, a hypothetical future when accelerating changes in artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and biotechnology will alter the very fabric of our world. According to writers such as Ray Kurzweil, Vernor Vinge, Sue Lange, and Greg Bear, such an event offers two potential routes for humankind: succumbing to higher forms of intelligence or evolving into cyborg or posthuman forms. We will explore the dystopian and utopian possibilities of the singularity through futurist scholarship, science fiction, and multimodal (or WOVEN) projects. Prospective projects for this course include a cyborg analysis of science fiction texts, an in-depth research project exploring contemporary technological developments that might usher in the singularity, and the creation of a speculative vision of our posthuman future.

ENGL 1102 LS – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Josh Hussey
Days and Times: TR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 212 ES&M. "Agent of the Multiverse: Brief Encounters with Speculative and Science Fiction," This course asks students to develop communication strategies through the analysis of texts set in the Speculative and Science Fiction genres. In this course, we will seek to consider language as a piece of scientific data that can be analyzed and interpreted into meaningful patterns, using Science Fiction as a backdrop. In addition to literature, we will watch films and play games, media that will direct us toward a broad understanding of how the genre operates. We’ll take exciting landscapes found in the wilds of SF lore and work to understand exactly how those ‘scapes are constructed rhetorically. Texts will include: short stories by Octavia Butler, N.K. Jemisin, and Ted Chiang; Jeff VanderMeer’s Annihilation (2014); films, Villeneuve’s Arrival (2016) and Tarkovsky’sStalker (1979); videogames, Lucas Pope’sPapers, Please (2013). Assignments: standard written essay; multimodal essay (film engagement); Blog writing, discussion board participation, reading quizzes; Sci-Fi aesthetics video presentations; final portfolio. The purpose of this course is to gain sophisticated abilities in multimodal (WOVEN) communication that build from ENGL 1101. Assignments will encourage the development of communication skills in academic research and argument. While this class covers specific content, the emphasis of the course remains on techniques of composition and rhetorical/argumentative strategies. All of our discussions and assignments will engage with Georgia Tech’s multimodal WOVEN communication (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Nonverbal), which taken together in synergy, will better enable us to describe the material and digital worlds in which we exist.

ENGL 1102 LS2 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Monica Miller
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: "Movement and Migration." In this class, we will use the theme of “movement and migration” in primarily twentieth- and twenty-first century literature. We will explore the literary and cultural impact of expansionism, (im)migration, industrialization, urbanization, disease, and war, as expressed by a variety of different American writers and characters. Students will increase their proficiency in textual analysis, academic research, and argumentation skills through multimodal composition. Major texts will include works by Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, Tony Kushner, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

ENGL 1102 QUP – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Josh Hussey
Days and Times: TR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: On-Line UG Program. "Agent of the Multiverse: Brief Encounters with Speculative and Science Fiction," This course asks students to develop communication strategies through the analysis of texts set in the Speculative and Science Fiction genres. In this course, we will seek to consider language as a piece of scientific data that can be analyzed and interpreted into meaningful patterns, using Science Fiction as a backdrop. In addition to literature, we will watch films and play games, media that will direct us toward a broad understanding of how the genre operates. We’ll take exciting landscapes found in the wilds of SF lore and work to understand exactly how those ‘scapes are constructed rhetorically. Texts will include: short stories by Octavia Butler, N.K. Jemisin, and Ted Chiang; Jeff VanderMeer’s Annihilation (2014); films, Villeneuve’s Arrival (2016) and Tarkovsky’sStalker (1979); videogames, Lucas Pope’sPapers, Please (2013). Assignments: standard written essay; multimodal essay (film engagement); Blog writing, discussion board participation, reading quizzes; Sci-Fi aesthetics video presentations; final portfolio.

ENGL 1102 SF1 – English Composition II

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Caroline Young
Location: Hall 103
Days and Times: MTWR 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Freshman English II.
Catalog Info: I, too, Sing America… In this course, students will read, watch, and listen to works of art that bring African American voices and perspectives to contemporary audiences through a variety of media. We will visit children’s author and artist Ashley Bryan’s retrospective art exhibit, currently on view at the High Museum of Art. We will explore the poetry and visual art gathered in Claudia Rankine’s multimedia text, Citizen: an American Lyric, and we will view two films: the 2017 comedy/horror release, Get Out and the feminist-journey film performed by Beyoncé as accompaniment to her 2016 conceptual album, Lemonade. These artists all strive to broaden our perspectives on America’s racial and gender challenges, reflecting the importance of intercultural dialogue while illustrating narrative’s power to effect change. Our own multi-modal responses will take the form of visual and written critical analyses along with team-generated websites and presentations that generate class discussions on the materials examined.

LMC 2500 LS – Introduction to Film

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Robert Wood
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Introduces film techniques and vocabulary in an historical and cultural context. Written texts are supplemented by viewings of specific shots, scenes, and films.
Catalog Info: This course serves as an introduction to film studies and related visual representation. First emphasis will be on film narrative, how stories are narrated with pictures. We will look as well at film genres and generic expectation as well as the historical origins of narrative cinema. In addition to film clips in class, we will see a film at the specified screening time each week. This class is designed to be taken with the class screenings. If you should miss the screening for any reason, you are responsible for seeing the film on your own. Grades will be based on a midterm (30 pts), final and term paper (35 pts each). Attendance is required and informed attendance may be monitored by quizzes. Text: Film Art: An Introduction 11th Edition Bordwell and Thompson THE FILMS North by Northwest (Hitchcock) 1959 131minutes The Godfather (Coppola) 1972 175 minutes Singin’ in the Rain (Donen, Kelly) 1952 103 minutes Children of Men (Cuarón) 2006 109 minutes No Country for Old Men (Coen Brothers) 2007 122 minutes Wings of Desire (Wenders) 1987 128 minutes The Triplets of Belleville (Chomet) 2003 80 minutes In the Mood for Love (Kar Wai Wong) 2000 98 minute Errol Morris Documentary TBA

LMC 3102 SS1 – Science, Technology, and the Classical Tradition

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Aaron Santesso
Location: Skiles 311
Days and Times: MWF 11am-1:30pm
Description: Explores the definition and transmission of science and technology within Greek, Arabic, and Medieval Latin contexts.
Course Attributes: Country and Region (IP), Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: One of the earliest surviving works of literature (The Epic of Gilgamesh) begins with the gods deciding to form a man (Enkidu) out of clay. From the beginning, then, writers have been fascinated by the relationship between artifice, technology, and humanity. This course will look at the earliest considerations of technology, of the nature of life, of the ways in which human beings might manipulate their environment. We will investigate the role of science and technology, and also philosophical considerations of man’s scientific power and its limits, in the work of a variety of scientific (Euclid, Galen), philosophical (Plato, Marcus Aurelius) and literary (Homer, Virgil) authors. Greek and Roman society will lie at the heart of the course, but we will also read ancient Hebrew, Sumerian, Indian and Egyptian texts. Major sub-themes will include “War,” “Creation,” and “Death/Afterlife.”

LMC 3112 RMZ – Evolution and the Industrial Age

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: MTWR 2:30pm-3:25pm
Description: Connects later nineteenth century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Connects later nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the literature and culture of the industrial age. Subjects for this iteration of the course include artistic and poetic depictions of revolution, war, and Romanticism; scientific accounts of evolution by natural selection; and evolutionary themes in naturalist fictions. Attributes: Humanities

LMC 3214 LS1 – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Peter Fontaine
Days and Times: TR 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: Location: Rm. 212 ES&M. We will explore the historical development of Science Fiction (SF) while formulating and testing definitions of the genre against examples in print, television, movies, and video games. In addition to charting SF’s origins, we will pay special attention to a major sub-genre of science fiction: Feminist SF.

LMC 3214 LS2 – Science Fiction

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Lisa Yaszek
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 12:30pm-2:20pm
Description: Examines science fiction texts from the last 200 years to show how they reflect ambiguous reactions to change.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: This class will introduce you to the literary and cultural history of science fiction (SF). We will examine how SF artists have developed a generic “grammar” (including specific themes, characters, story types, and stylistic rules) to speculate about the future of science, technology, and society. We will also examine how this grammar changes over time, as SF artists respond to the aesthetic and technoscientific issues of their historic and cultural moments.

LMC 3226 LS – Major Authors

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Blake Leland
Location: Skiles 317
Days and Times: TR 12:30pm-1:20pm
Description: An examination of the works and career of a major author in historical and cultural context.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: "Modern American Poets." Until the first half of the 20th century, most American poets wrote a kind of hand-me-down verse that echoed British poetry. The significant exceptions were two great 19th c. poets, Whitman (who many thought immoral and/or insane) and Dickinson (who published almost nothing, and was thus unknown). But in the first part of the 20th century, a number of American poets working in modes that were not weak copies of British models burst on the scene. They may not have been the most popular poets of their time, nor the easiest to read, but they are still considered to be among the preeminent masters of the Modernist (or Modern) era—and they are American. In this class, you will read, closely and intensely, a number of these major Modern American Poems.

LMC 3234 KG – Creative Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kathleen Goonan
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MTWR 9am-4pm
Description: Prerequisite(s) Engl 1102 This course explores a range of creative literary genres, and combines study and analysis of existing modes of one or more forms in order to establish a basis for original creative work by class members.
Course Attributes: Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: LMC 3234/4813 will consist of in-class critiques of student stories and participation in the process of revisions. The course covers the elements of good fiction, including character development, pacing, plot, voice, and style, and will also cover the process of getting published. The goal of the class is to refine one’s own story and, through research of markets, contests, and grants, develop a viable submission plan for it and for one’s subsequent stories.

LMC 3257 LS – Global Cinema

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Jay Telotte
Location: Skiles 368
Days and Times: TR 10:05am-11:55am
Description: This course examines significant movements, styles, and trends in world cinema, with an emphasis on how the global nature of contemporary film affects cultural representation. "
Catalog Info: This course looks at a specific strand of global cinema, as it surveys how various cultures outside of the US have contributed to the development of the science fiction genre. The course considers a variety of international works under three broad headings: 1) the possibility of changes in society and culture, 2) the impact of forces outside the human realm, including encounters with alien beings and other worlds, and 3) technological alterations in or substitute versions of the self. There will be daily screenings of films or clips, we shall read material on science fiction films and film history, and we shall discuss the screenings and readings. Grades depend on an oral report (25%), a mid-term test (25%), a comprehensive final (25%), and a research paper (25%).

LMC 3318 RMZ – Biomedicine & Culture

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Carol Colatrella
Days and Times: MTWR 4:30pm-5:25pm
Description: Discusses the history of biology and medicine; popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; and the cultural implications of medical imaging technologies.
Course Attributes: Ethics Requirement, Humanities Requirement
Catalog Info: This course discusses the history of biology and medicine; popular representations of health, disease, and the medical establishment; cross-cultural ethical issues; and the cultural implications of medical technologies. Subjects include the development of principles of experimental medicine, the Tuskegee syphilis study and the establishment of bioethics, the race among researchers to discover the HIV virus causing AIDS, and patients’ rights and genetic technology. Attributes: Humanities, Ethics

LMC 3403 LS – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Rebekah Greene
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: MWF 9:30am-10:45am
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: This Technical Communication course (“Technical Communication: The Problem of Water”) emphasizes effective engagement with information using strategies and practices that allow for successful communication with a variety of stakeholders. Students will develop a range of multimodal and traditional workplace artifacts that highlight and demonstrate awareness of audience, argument, language, persuasion, and design. This particular class will be researching water systems in cooperation with the Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain initiative and the Center’s desire to expand sustainability efforts both at Georgia Tech and in the greater Atlanta area. Students will be working on a variety of technical communications (including presentations, surveys, and feasibility reports) relating to contemporary water-based issues and sustainability initiatives, as well as working with a small team of peers and a locally-based community partner organization interested in issues relating to water.

LMC 3403 LS2 – Technical Communication: Theory and Practice

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Halcyon Lawrence
Location: Hall 106
Days and Times: TR 12:30pm-2:20pm
Description: This course introduces students to workplace document genres to develop visual and verbal skills in critical analysis and document development.
Catalog Info: Technical Communication: Theory and Practice Have you ever downloaded an app and agreed to the terms of use without ever reading it? Have you ever tried reading the terms of use without making it past the first paragraph? Terms of use and end-user license agreements (EULAs) are contracts governing relations between providers and end-users of software, websites, mobile applications, and the internet of things. These contracts are ubiquitous: In effect provider-licensors like Facebook are free to write private laws that govern nearly every global digital community and every digital medium. EULAs raise important issues in technical communication, human-computer interaction, intellectual property law, business ethics, and technology policy. This technical communication course takes a research-based approach to the EULA ‘problem space’. The class is designed as a continuous lab, which means that every semester a new group of students continue to work on the project and develop a meaningful deliverable which is handed off to a future class. This summer we have inherited an assessment criteria or a list of heuristics for evaluating the readability of EULAs. Taking an approach widely used in the field of usability testing called a heuristic evaluation, we will evaluate a number of EULAs using the heuristics and make recommendations for the improvement of the assessment criteria.

LMC 3431 JIA – Technical Communication Approaches

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kelly Ann Fitzpatrick
Location: College of Computing [CoC] 53
Days and Times: T 10:05am-11:55am
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: This course is part 2 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course that includes a computer science and technical communication component. In part one of the course, you selected a project, interacted with the client, developed the project requirements, and prototyped the application. Additionally, you either began testing the usability of your prototype (so that you could observe how typical users interface with your prototype and get feedback to improve on its design), or you practiced and honed your abilities to analyze the technical needs of your project by researching the feasibility of several approaches and proposed the one with which you felt was most optimal. This semester, as you work toward building and delivering your project's main deliverables, you will continue revising and refining the project's goals, uses, and results through technical documentation. You will practice visual rhetoric in a detailed design of your system. Then, you will analyze the team’s performance by developing a sprint retrospective and documenting it in a memorandum. As you finish your project, you will look back on all the work you have done in a reflective memo, while at the same time writing release notes and preparing other client delivery documentation, and, finally, giving a presentation for the handoff of your project. Throughout the semester, you will be tracking and managing your work through weekly status reports and use of an iteration board.

LMC 3432 JDA – Technical Communication Strategies

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Casey Wilson
Location: College of Computing [CoC] 53
Days and Times: R 2:35pm-4:25pm
Description: Part of a multi-semester sequence that students take in tandem with major-specific classes to develop professional written, visual, oral, and analytic strategies.
Catalog Info: See instructor for course description details.

LMC 4701 A – Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: T 9:30am-10:45am
Description: Research proposal writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the preliminary (proposal writing) stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include planning, research, and documentation, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, and oral (poster) presentations. Because the course will enroll from different disciplines, you will become acquainted with research topics, ways of framing arguments, and making points outside your field of study, which will help you develop a more interdisciplinary perspective.

LMC 4702 A – Undergraduate Research Thesis Writing

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Malavika Shetty
Location: Skiles 308
Days and Times: T 11am-12:15pm
Description: Research thesis writing.
Catalog Info: This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from all disciplines through the stages of writing their undergraduate theses. Topics include research and documentation, journal submissions, prose style and editing, document design, ethics, and oral (powerpoint) presentations.

LMC 4813 KG – Special Topics

Credit Hours: 3
Instructor: Kathleen Goonan
Location: Skiles 343
Days and Times: MTWR 9am-4pm
Description: Class and credit hours equal last digit in course number. Topics of current interest not covered in the regular course offerings.
Catalog Info: LMC 3234/4813 will consist of in-class critiques of student stories and participation in the process of revisions. The course covers the elements of good fiction, including character development, pacing, plot, voice, and style, and will also cover the process of getting published. The goal of the class is to refine one’s own story and, through research of markets, contests, and grants, develop a viable submission plan for it and for one’s subsequent stories.